Tuesday, March 24, 2015

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[IWS] ADB: ASIAN DEVELOPMENT OUTLOOK 2015: FINANCING ASIA'S FUTURE GROWTH [24 March 2015]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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NOTE: Funding for this service ends on 31 March 2015. Postings will end on this date as well.

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

 

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT OUTLOOK 2015: FINANCING ASIA'S FUTURE GROWTH [24 March 2015]

http://www.adb.org/publications/asian-development-outlook-2015-financing-asias-future-growth

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/154508/ado-2015.pdf

[full-text, 328 pages]

and

Highlights

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/154508/ado-2015-highlights.pdf

 

[full-text, 18 pages]

 

ADB's Asian Development Outlook (ADO) 2015 projects that Developing Asia will grow at a steady 6.3% in 2015 and 2016, supported by a strengthening recovery in the major industrial economies and soft global commodity prices.

 

The drop in international oil prices is taking pressure off of consumer prices. Inflation will slow from 3.1% in 2014 to 2.6% in 2015.

 

As low oil prices are supporting growth in developing Asia, a sudden sharp reversal could undermine the outlook and require policy response. Similarly, while capital inflows to the region have been beneficial for growth, policy makers must carefully manage credit expansion to ensure that it does not lead to excessive leverage and asset price bubbles.

 

Developing Asia needs a deep, robust financial sector to sustain growth. Policy makers will be challenged to ensure that financial sector development is inclusive, providing broad access to households and firms. Financial stability must also be maintained to enhance growth and equity.

 

About the Asian Development Outlook

The annual Asian Development Outlook provides a comprehensive analysis of economic performance in the past year and offers forecasts for the next 2 years for the 45 economies in Asia and the Pacific that make up developing Asia.

 

 

Contents

 

Part 1  Oil in the gears of growth

Steady growth and stable prices in developing Asia

How lower oil prices affect Asia

Is Asia's debt a threat to growth?

Annex: Low oil price supports recovery

Part 2  Financing Asia's future growth

The case for further developing the financial sector

Financial development for growth

Financial access for inclusion

Financial stability to safeguard inclusive growth

Toward finance that fosters stable and inclusive growth

Part 3  Economic trends and prospects in developing Asia

Central Asia           

Armenia          

Azerbaijan      

Georgia          

Kazakhstan     

Kyrgyz Republic          

Tajikistan          

Turkmenistan          

Uzbekistan          

East Asia          

People's Republic of China | 中文

Hong Kong, China         

Republic of Korea         

Mongolia         

Taipei,China         

South Asia          

Afghanistan         

Bangladesh         

Bhutan         

India         

Maldives         

Nepal         

Pakistan         

Sri Lanka         

Southeast Asia          

Brunei Darussalam         

Cambodia         

Indonesia         

Lao People's Democratic Republic         

Malaysia         

Myanmar         

Philippines         

Singapore         

Thailand         

Viet Nam          

The Pacific          

Fiji         

Papua New Guinea         

Solomon Islands         

Timor-Leste        

Vanuatu

North Pacific economies         

South Pacific economies         

Small island economies         

Statistical appendix   

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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