Friday, October 24, 2014

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[IWS} ODEP launches PEAT--WEB PORTAL ON ACCESSIBLE WORKPLACE TECHNOLOGY [15 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

DOL: OFFICE OF DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT POLICY (ODEP)

 

PARTNERSHIP ON EMPLOYMENT & ACCESSIBLE TECHNOLOGY (PEAT)

http://www.peatworks.org/

 

·       Employers

·       Technology Providers

·       Technology Users

·       Resources & Tools

·       Articles

 

Welcome to PEATworks.org—Your gateway to tools, resources, and collaboration in the pursuit of accessible workplace technology.

 

Please browse our site to find resources for employers, http://www.peatworks.org/employers technology providers, http://www.peatworks.org/technology-providers

and technology users http://www.peatworks.org/technology-users with disabilities.

 

The Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT) is a multi-faceted initiative promoting the employment, retention, and career advancement of people with disabilities through the development, adoption, and promotion of accessible technology. PEAT is funded by the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy (link is external) and is managed by the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) (link is external). Guided by a consortium of policy and technology leaders, PEAT is the only entity of its kind that brings together employers, technology providers, thought leaders, and technology users around the intersecting topics of accessible technology and employment.

 

Press Release 15 October 2014
US Labor Department's Office of Disability Employment Policy announces launch of Web portal on accessible workplace technology
http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/odep/ODEP20141935.htm

 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy today announced the launch ofhttp://www.PEATworks.org — a comprehensive Web portal spearheaded by ODEP's Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology. From educational articles to interactive tools, the website's content aims to help employers and the technology industry adopt accessible technology as part of everyday business practice so that all workers can benefit.

 

PEATworks.org will be the central hub of PEAT, a multifaceted initiative to improve the employment, retention and career advancement of people with disabilities through the promotion of accessible technology. PEAT conducts outreach, facilitates collaboration and provides a mix of resources to serve as a catalyst for policy development and innovation related to accessible technology in the workplace.

"PEAT is the only entity of its kind bringing together employers, technology providers, thought leaders and technology users around the topic of accessible technology and employment," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez. "Given the critical role that accessible technology plays in the employment of people with disabilities, ODEP is delighted to announce the launch of PEATworks.org, with its rich array of tools and resources.

 

Features of PEATworks.org include an action guide for employers and informational articles, and it will serve as a platform for collaboration and dialogue around accessible technology in the workplace. Also featured is "TechCheck," an interactive tool to help employers assess their technology accessibility practices and find resources to help develop them further.

ODEP is announcing the launch of PEATworks.org during National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an annual series of events in October that raise awareness and celebrate the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities.

 

PEAT is managed through an ODEP-funded grant to the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America. For more information, visit http://www.PEATworks.org.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] World Bank: DO AFRICAN CHILDREN HAVE AN EQUAL CHANCE?: A HUMAN OPPORTUNITY REPORT FOR SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA [October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

World Bank

 

DO AFRICAN CHILDREN HAVE AN EQUAL CHANCE?: A HUMAN OPPORTUNITY REPORT FOR SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA [October 2014]

by Andrew Dabalen, Ambar Narayan, Jaime Saavedra-Chanduvi, and Alejandro Hoyos Suarez, with Ana Abras and Sailesh Tiwari

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/20458

or

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/20458/916400PUB0Box30UBLIC009781464803321.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 205 pages]

 

This study explores the changing opportunities for children in Africa. While the definition

of opportunities can be subjective and depend on the societal context, this report focuses on efforts to build

future human capital, directly (through education and health investments) and indirectly (through complementary

infrastructure such as safe water, adequate sanitation, electricity, and so on). It follows the practice of earlier

studies conducted for the Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region (Barros et al. 2009, 2012) where

opportunities are basic goods and services that constitute investments in children. Although several opportunities are

relevant at different stages of an individual s life, our focus on children s access to education, health services,

safe water, and adequate nutrition is due to the well-known fact that an individual s chance of success in life is

deeply influenced by access to these goods and services early in life. Children s access to these basic services

improves the likelihood of a child being able to maximize his/her human potential and pursue a life of dignity.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS} UI: MONITORING THE IMPACT OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT ON EMPLOYERS: LITERATURE REVIEW [23 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Urban Institute (UI)

 

MONITORING THE IMPACT OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT ON EMPLOYERS: LITERATURE REVIEW [23 October 2014]

by Fredric Blavin, Bowen Garrett, Linda J. Blumberg, Matthew Buettgens, Sarah Gadsden, Shanna Rifkin

http://www.urban.org/publications/413273.html

or

http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/413273-Monitoring-the-Impact-of-the-Affordable-Care-Act-on-Employers.pdf

[full-text, 56 pages]

 

In this report, we analyze recent trends in the employer health insurance market and the anticipated effects of the Affordable Care Act on employers, with a particular focus on small firms with fewer than 50 workers. We first present a detailed picture of the employer market by identifying preexisting trends in key outcomes that could be incorrectly attributed to the Affordable Care Act. We also analyze the literature to identify economic factors that are important in current employer and employee decisions regarding health coverage.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] EUROPEAN UNION OPEN DATA PORTAL

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

EUROPEAN UNION OPEN DATA PORTAL

http://open-data.europa.eu/en/data/

 

As of 24 October 2014, there are more than 7250 datasets available.

 

see About

http://open-data.europa.eu/en/about

 

The EU Open Data Portal is your single point of access to a growing range of data produced by the institutions and other bodies of the European Union.

 

Data are free to use, reuse, link and redistribute for commercial or non-commercial purposes.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


Thursday, October 23, 2014

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[IWS] BCG: MADE IN AMERICA, AGAIN: THIRD ANNUAL SURVEY OF U.S.-BASED MANUFACTURING EXECUTIVES [23 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Boston Consulting Group (BCG)

 

MADE IN AMERICA, AGAIN: THIRD ANNUAL SURVEY OF U.S.-BASED MANUFACTURING EXECUTIVES [23 October 2014]

http://www.slideshare.net/TheBostonConsultingGroup/bcg-mfg-survey-key-findings-slideshare-deckoctober-2014f3

 

Press Release 23 October 2014

U.S. Executives Remain Bullish on American Manufacturing, Study Finds

http://www.bcg.com/media/PressReleaseDetails.aspx?id=tcm:12-174453

Decision Makers at Large Manufacturers Expect the U.S. Share of Their Production to Rise an Average of 7 Percent in Five Years; Half Expect to Boost U.S. Factory Jobs by 5 Percent or More, According to Latest BCG Manufacturing Survey

 

CHICAGO, October 23, 2014—U.S.-based executives at large companies remain bullish on American manufacturing, and their actions are starting to show it, according to new research by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG).

 

The firm’s third annual survey of senior manufacturing executives at companies with sales of $1 billion or more found that the number of respondents who said that their companies are already bringing production back from China to the United States had risen 20 percent—from roughly 13 percent to 16 percent—in the past year. The number who said that they would consider returning production in the near future climbed 24 percent—from about 17 percent to 20 percent. And a majority (54 percent) expressed interest in reshoring, validating last year’s result (also 54 percent).

 

The 2014 survey—conducted by BCG’s Center for Consumer and Customer Insight in August, one year after last year’s—drew responses from 252 decision makers across a broad range of industries.

 

“These findings show that not only does interest in repatriating production to the U.S. and creating American jobs remain strong but also that companies are acting on those intentions,” said Harold L. Sirkin, a BCG senior partner and coauthor of the firm’s series on the shifting economics of global manufacturing, which was launched in 2011.

 

Another noteworthy finding this year: respondents indicated that the U.S. had surpassed Mexico as the most likely destination for new manufacturing capacity to serve the U.S. market. While the percentage of executives who chose the U.S. rose from 26 percent to 27 percent, the percentage who chose Mexico slipped from 26 percent to 24 percent.

 

In addition, respondents predicted that the U.S. would account for an average of 47 percent of their total production in five years, reflecting a 7 percent increase in U.S. capacity compared with last year’s results. Only 11 percent of their capacity would be in China, a 21 percent decrease from last year. Respondents forecast that the share of production in Mexico, Western Europe, and the rest of Asia would also drop. (See the exhibit below.)

 

Anticipated mix of total manufacturing capacity in five years

 

By a three-to-one margin, respondents also predicted that reshoring would create U.S. manufacturing jobs within five years. Fifty percent of the respondents said that they expect to boost their U.S.-manufacturing workforces by 5 percent or more. Only 17 percent predicted that their companies would be employing at least 5 percent fewer manufacturing workers in the U.S. five years from now. The survey findings reinforce a previous BCG estimate that reshored production, along with rising exports, could create between 600,000 and 1 million direct manufacturing jobs by 2020.

 

Another trend seen in the findings is that U.S. manufacturers are increasingly considering factors other than direct costs such as labor when they devise their production strategies. More than 70 percent cited better access to skilled talent as a reason for moving operations to the U.S.—more than four times as many respondents as those who cited access to talent as a reason for relocating production outside the U.S. For goods that would be sold in the United States, around 80 percent cited logistical reasons such as shorter supply chains and lower shipping costs as primary reasons for moving operations to the U.S. from other countries.

 

“We have long advised companies to look at the total cost of manufacturing in the U.S. and to consider the entire supply chain—not just the obvious factors such as wages,” said Michael Zinser, a BCG partner who leads the firm’s manufacturing practice in the Americas. “When companies take a holistic view, the U.S. increasingly comes out ahead, particularly if those products are to be consumed in the U.S.”

 

The survey also found that large U.S. manufacturers see a payoff from investing in advanced manufacturing technologies, such as 3-D printing, robotics, and digital manufacturing. Fifty-six percent of respondents said they either “strongly agree” or “somewhat agree” that the declining costs of automation have improved the competitiveness of their products against those made in low-cost countries. Seventy-one percent said that advanced manufacturing will improve the economics of producing locally. And 72 percent indicated that their companies plan to invest in automation or other advanced manufacturing technologies in the next five years.

 

“The combination of improved U.S. cost competitiveness in terms of labor and energy and the increased productivity that can be gained from advanced manufacturing technologies makes the case for manufacturing in America even stronger,” said Justin Rose, a BCG partner and coauthor, along with Sirkin and Zinser, of The U.S. Manufacturing Renaissance: How Shifting Global Economics Are Creating an American Comeback (Knowledge@Wharton, 2012).

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] Towers Watson: INDIAN EMPLOYEES HEAVILY DEPENDENT ON EMPLOYERS FOR POST-RETIREMENT INCOME [22 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Towers Watson

 

Press Release 22 October 2014

INDIAN EMPLOYEES HEAVILY DEPENDENT ON EMPLOYERS FOR POST-RETIREMENT INCOME

Retirement benefits emerge as an important retention driver

http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Press/2014/10/Indian-Employees-heavily-dependent-on-employers-for-post-retirement-income

 

see-Global Uncertainty Fuels Workers' Desire for Retirement Security

2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey

http://www.towerswatson.com/en-IN/Insights/IC-Types/Survey-Research-Results/2014/05/global-uncertainty-fuels-workers-desire-for-retirement-security

or

http://www.towerswatson.com/DownloadMedia.aspx?media={0F037D90-1F1F-448D-842A-221A91665B5E}

 

 

National, October, 2014 - Employer retirement plans have emerged as the top source of income for retirement for many employees, according to the Global Benefits Attitudes Survey, conducted by global professional services company Towers Watson. Minimal social security benefits and inadequate awareness about suitable retirement savings vehicles have resulted in employees becoming over dependent on retirement plans provided by employers. Employees who are members of a retirement plan believe that their most important income sources during retirement are likely to be their employer retirement plan, followed by savings/investments and property.

This trend is accentuated amongst employees approaching retirement, with 78% (of those with a retirement plan) saying their retirement plan is the primary way they save for retirement, compared to 68% of those under forty.

Interestingly, only 12% of Indian employees who agree their retirement plan meets their needs plan to leave their organisation in the next 2 years compared to 39% of those who disagree the plan meets their needs, signalling a noteworthy co-relation between the two and a likely confirmation that retirement benefits are emerging as an important retention driver.

The survey undertaken across 12 countries, drawing participation from 22,347 employees working for large, non-government employers, shows emerging economies like India and China enjoy a higher savings culture as compared to their western counterparts like US and UK. With a majority of Indian employees expecting to retire around 60, despite a high savings rate, a large number are not confident of affording a long spell of retirement.

EMPLOYEE PREFERENCE MISMATCH

When given a choice between a better retirement provision and larger base pay, employees have begun opting for generous and guaranteed retirement benefit. However, when given an independent choice between the various components of rewards, Indian employees prefer a larger base pay hike across all age groups. This contradiction signals a visible need for employers to enhance retirement education and help employees understand the value of retirement benefits.

Commenting on the growing importance of the retirement benefits, Ms. Anuradha Sriram, Director – Benefits, Towers Watson, India said, “Traditionally, retirement planning has never been an important financial priority owing to the Indian family structure and elders dependence on their children. However, the breakdown of traditional support systems, increased longevity, rising inflation and rapid urbanization now require a large proportion of the current working population to build their own retirement corpus.”

 

“It is important that employers educate their employees on the need and value of retirement planning and provide them adequate tools to help them to save adequately and manage their financial risks better. As the war for talent intensifies, retirement benefits have emerged as a powerful tool to boost employee retention and given its growing importance, progressive employers will re-examine the total rewards mix and leverage such benefits as a differentiator. ” she further added.

 

ABOUT THE SURVEY

Towers Watson’s Global Benefits Attitudes Survey examines employees’ attitudes toward their health and retirement benefits. Conducted in 12 countries, the survey was completed by 22,347 employees working in large non-governmental organizations, including 2,006 employees in India, of whom 1,669 are members of a retirement savings plan.

The Towers Watson 2013/2014 Global Benefits Attitudes Survey report is available here.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] Towers Watson: CHINA REPORT: 2014 CURRENT AND EMERGING THEMES; Employee Benefits: A Headquarters Perspective [22 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Towers Watson

 

2014 CURRENT AND EMERGING THEMES: CHINA REPORT [22 October 2014]

Employee Benefits: A Headquarters Perspective

http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/IC-Types/Survey-Research-Results/2014/09/2014-Current-and-Emerging-Global-Themes-China-report

or

http://www.towerswatson.com/DownloadMedia.aspx?media={A8FD381C-B6F9-4F88-A1C9-16B0D6A5233C}

[full-text, 36 pages]

 

AT A GLANCE

·       As Chinese multinationals ramp up their global expansion, they are paying increasing attention to developing, managing and retaining global talent.

·       Half of Chinese multinationals are at the initial stages of their global benefit management journey.

·       Chinese multinationals need to consider taking steps to establish global approval processes, conduct benchmarking and maintain a structured benefit inventory.

 

Multinational companies’ annual benefit costs are often hundreds of millions of dollars, with past commitments of several billions of dollars. The seventh annual Current and Emerging Global Benefit Themes research provides insights into how leading companies seize the opportunities presented by benefit provision to add business value.

KEY INSIGHTS INCLUDE:

·       Chinese multinationals are paying increasing attention to global rewards and talent management. As Chinese companies expand further on the global stage, there is a greater need for varying rewards among different groups and benchmarking rewards across geographies. They are making efforts in both areas. Chinese multinationals also share the concerns of their global counterparts about bringing the right talent aboard to be successful, especially in overseas markets where companies typically do not have any experience. Compared with 2013, there has been a 15-percentage-point increase (from 50% to 65%) in interest among Chinese multinationals in developing, managing and retaining global talent.

 

·       Half of Chinese multinationals are at the initial stages of their global benefit management journey. Fifty percent of Chinese multinationals are getting started, either through initial data gathering to determine what they will need in order to expand, or learning by doing, by expanding for the first time into a market outside China.

 

·       Compared with U.S. and European multinationals, Chinese multinationals need to consider taking action steps to catch up in three areas: establishing global approval processes, conducting regular benefit benchmarking and maintaining a structured benefit inventory. Global approval processes are excellent, though not perfect, hedges to protect company interests. Benchmarking is a key management technique to ensure that reward objectives are being met. Maintaining a structured benefit inventory helps multinationals understand what benefit programs are provided globally and also helps in transaction situations.

Our research findings show that Chinese multinationals’ current and short-term priorities in 2014 and beyond are:

·       Maximising the employee experience while optimising benefit spending

·       Financing health and risk benefits more efficiently, and taking advantage of global scale

·       Getting a better grip on benefit costs around the world

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] IADB: GOVERNING TO DELIVER: REINVENTING THE CENTER OF GOVERNMENT IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN [October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Inter-American Development Bank (IADB)

 

GOVERNING TO DELIVER: REINVENTING THE CENTER OF GOVERNMENT IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN [October 2014]

by Alessandro, Martín; Lafuente, Mariano; Santiso, Carlos

http://publications.iadb.org/handle/11319/6674?scope=123456789/1&thumbnail=true&rpp=5&page=1&group_by=none&etal=0

or

http://publications.iadb.org/bitstream/handle/11319/6674/Governing-to-Deliver-Reinventing-the-Center-of-Government-in-Latin-America-and-the-Caribbean.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 172 pages]

 

Center of Government institutions, which work directly with the Head of the Executive Branch at any level of government, are essential to provide direction and coherence to the government and to ensure the delivery of its priorities and results for citizens. This publication presents the knowledge produced by the IDB on this topic, and includes a novel conceptual framework on this subject, an analysis of the regional trends of Center of Government performance in the region, two case studies of recent innovations at the national (Chile) and subnational (Pernambuco, Brazil) levels, and policy recommendations based on these analyses and on some of the best international practices. The publication also presents a methodological tool (the Institutional Development Matrix) that allows decision makers to diagnose the actual performance of Center of Government functions in their countries, in order to tailor reform initiatives to their specific context and challenges.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] Catalyst: HIGH POTENTIALS IN TECH-INTENSIVE INDUSTRIES: THE GENDER DIVIDE IN BUSINESS ROLES [23 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Catalyst, Inc.

 

HIGH POTENTIALS IN TECH-INTENSIVE INDUSTRIES: THE GENDER DIVIDE IN BUSINESS ROLES [23 October 2014]

http://www.catalyst.org/knowledge/high-potentials-tech-intensive-industries-gender-divide-business-roles

or

http://www.catalyst.org/system/files/high_potentials_in_tech-intensive_industries_the_gender_divide_in_business_roles_0.pdf

[full-text, 16 pages]

 

Press Release 23 October 2014

Catalyst’s Global Report Uncovers New Layers of Inequity for Women in STEM Industries

http://www.catalyst.org/media/catalysts-global-report-uncovers-new-layers-inequity-women-stem-industries

 

NEW YORK (October 23, 2014)— It’s no secret that women in tech roles in STEM—the science, technology, engineering and math industries—face significant challenges. Catalyst’s groundbreaking new global report, High Potentials in Tech-Intensive Industries: The Gender Divide in Business Roles, shows that those on the business side are impacted too, and it reveals a culture that is particularly unwelcoming to women, no matter what the job.
 
This research is the first to study men and women in business roles in technology-intensive industries such as high tech and telecommunications, oil and gas, and automotive manufacturing. It shines a light on the male-dominated culture of STEM companies as a whole and provides specific steps organizations can take to better attract and retain talented women across both its tech and business sectors.
 

“STEM companies face a serious talent drain as women take their skills elsewhere, but these organizations also have a remarkable opportunity to turn things around by focusing on how they can make all their talent—men and women alike—feel equally valued,” says Deborah Gillis, President and CEO, Catalyst.

Key Findings:


Women are less likely to enter tech-intensive industries and more likely to leave once they join.  

  • Only 18% of women opted for a business role in a tech-intensive industry immediately following their MBA, compared to 24% of men.
  • 53% of women who started out in a business role in a tech-intensive industry post-MBA left to take a position in another industry, compared to 31% of men.

Women are outsiders and on unequal footing from day one.

  • Despite having the same education as their male counterparts, women in business roles in tech-intensive industries were more likely than men to start in entry-level positions (women, 55%; men, 39%) and to be paid less.
  • Of those who took their first post-MBA job in a business role in a tech-intensive industry, men were more than three times as likely (83%) as women (27%) to say they felt similar to most people at work.
  • High potentials who took their first post-MBA job in a business role in a tech-intensive industry were significantly more likely to work on a team with 10% or few women than those in other industries (tech-intensive industries, 21%; other industries, 16%).

Barriers include lack of role models and vague evaluation criteria, so it’s not surprising that women in business roles in tech-intensive industries have lower aspirations.

  • High potentials were significantly less likely to have a female supervisor than those working in other industries (tech-intensive industries, 15%; other industries, 21%).
  • Women in tech-intensive industries were significantly less likely than women in other industries to say that their supervisors clearly showed them how their work would be evaluated (tech-intensive industries, 42%; other industries, 55%).
  • Women in their first post-MBA job were less likely than men to aspire to the senior executive/CEO levels (women, 84%; men, 97%).

By intentionally addressing the barriers, tech-intensive companies CAN transform their cultures, become an employer of choice for women, and gain a competitive advantage.

Catalyst offers concrete suggestions and action steps for reversing the talent drain:

·       Start men and women at equal levels and pay.

·       Evaluate company culture: Is hostile behavior toward women tolerated? Do events outside of the office exclude women? Consider how the organization can make women feel valued and included.

·       Recruit senior male executives to sponsor up-and-coming women.

·       Make performance standards crystal clear.

·       Provide a flexible work environment.

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] IADB: TRADE AND INTEGRATION MONITOR 2014: FACING HEADWINDS: POLICIES TO SUPPORT A TRADE RECOVERY IN THE POST-CRISIS ERA [October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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Inter-Amercican Development Bank (IADB)

 

TRADE AND INTEGRATION MONITOR 2014: FACING HEADWINDS: POLICIES TO SUPPORT A TRADE RECOVERY IN THE POST-CRISIS ERA [October 2014]

http://publications.iadb.org/handle/11319/6662?scope=123456789/1&thumbnail=true&rpp=5&page=1&group_by=none&etal=0

or

http://publications.iadb.org/bitstream/handle/11319/6662/Monitor_2014_ENG.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 71 pages]

 

In Spanish at

http://publications.iadb.org/bitstream/handle/11319/6662/Monitor_2014.pdf?sequence=2

 

This report provides a detailed analysis of the principal characteristics of LAC's exports during the post-crisis period. The weak performance of the export sector stems from a combination of multiple variables operating in the global economy and whose future remains uncertain. In any case, the trends identified in this analysis represent a warning for the region and emphasize the need to support the recovery of the export sector. This is particularly true in the area of trade policies, where measures to remedy the situation do not rise to the magnitude of the challenges.

 

 The first section examines the principal characteristics of the slowdown in world and regional trade since the middle of 2011. The second section provides an overview of the region's trade performance between 2012 and 2013, as well as the trends in value and composition of the regional export basket in 2013, highlighting the key factors in each subregion and country. Additionally, it presents an analysis of the evolution of the terms of trade of the region, outlining the deterioration of the last two years, as well as the contributions of price and volume changes to the trajectory of foreign sales. The third section discusses recent developments in the trade policy sphere, with emphasis on the progress of multilateral and regional agreements on trade facilitation.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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