Monday, June 02, 2014

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[IWS] NO DAILY POSTINGS until 25 AUGUST 2014

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

 

NOTE: There will be NO DAILY POSTINGS until 25 AUGUST 2014. This is because the IWS Documented News Service does not operate during the months of JUNE, JULY, and most of AUGUST.

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wednesday, May 28, 2014

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[IWS] BLS: METROPOLITAN AREA EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- APRIL 2014 [28 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

METROPOLITAN AREA EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- APRIL 2014 [28 May 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/metro.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/metro.pdf

[full-text, 23 pages]

and

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

http://www.bls.gov/web/metro.supp.toc.htm

 

 

Unemployment rates were lower in April than a year earlier in 357 of the 372

metropolitan areas, higher in 12 areas, and unchanged in 3 areas, the U.S.

Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Fourteen areas had jobless rates

of at least 10.0 percent and 118 areas had rates of less than 5.0 percent.

Nonfarm payroll employment increased over the year in 302 metropolitan areas,

decreased in 63 areas, and was unchanged in 7 areas. The national unemployment

rate in April was 5.9 percent, not seasonally adjusted, down from 7.1 percent

a year earlier.

 

Metropolitan Area Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

 

Yuma, Ariz., and El Centro, Calif., had the highest unemployment rates in

April, 23.8 percent and 21.6 percent, respectively. Midland, Texas, had the

lowest unemployment rate, 2.3 percent. A total of 214 areas had April

unemployment rates below the U.S. figure of 5.9 percent, 148 areas had rates

above it, and 10 areas had rates equal to that of the nation. (See table 1.)

 

Yuma, Ariz., had the largest over-the-year unemployment rate decrease in April

(-3.0 percentage points). Fifty-one other areas had rate declines of at least

2.0 percentage points, and an additional 201 areas had declines of at least

1.0 point. Florence-Muscle Shoals, Ala., had the largest over-the-year jobless

rate increase (+1.0 percentage point).

 

Of the 49 metropolitan areas with a Census 2000 population of 1 million or more,

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif., had the highest unemployment rate in

April, 8.3 percent. Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, Texas, and Oklahoma City, Okla.,

had the lowest jobless rates among the large areas, 3.8 percent each. Forty-eight

of the large areas had over-the-year unemployment rate decreases, while one had

an increase. The largest unemployment rate decline occurred in Las Vegas-Paradise,

Nev. (-2.5 percentage points). Birmingham-Hoover, Ala., had the only jobless rate

increase (+0.4 percentage point).

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] EIRO: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS COUNTRY PROFILES [updated May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)
European Industrial Relations Observatory (EIRO)

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS COUNTRY PROFILES [updated May 2014]
http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/eiro/country_index.htm


Background information on industrial relations in 27 EU member states and a number of other countries: facts and figures, links to sources, an overview of the main industrial relations features, actors, processes and outcomes. The national profiles can be accessed by selecting a country from the list below, and will be updated every two years.

Country

Articles

Country Profile

Austria

Austria – articles

Austria – country profile

Belgium

Belgium – articles

Belgium – country profile

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bosnia and Herzegovina – articles

Bosnia and Herzegovina – country profile

Bulgaria

Bulgaria – articles

Bulgaria – country profile

Croatia

Croatia – articles

Croatia – country profile

Cyprus

Cyprus – articles

Cyprus – country profile

Czech Republic

Czech Republic – articles

Czech Republic – country profile

Denmark

Denmark – articles

Denmark – country profile

Estonia

Estonia – articles

Estonia – country profile

Finland

Finland – articles

Finland – country profile

France

France – articles

France – country profile

Germany

Germany – articles

Germany – country profile

Greece

Greece – articles

Greece – country profile

Hungary

Hungary – articles

Hungary – country profile

Ireland

Ireland – articles

Ireland – country profile

Italy

Italy – articles

Italy – country profile

Japan

Japan – articles

Japan – country profile

Kosovo

Kosovo – articles

Kosovo – country profile

Latvia

Latvia – articles

Latvia – country profile

Lithuania

Lithuania – articles

Lithuania – country profile

Luxembourg

Luxembourg – articles

Luxembourg – country profile

Macedonia

Macedonia – articles

Macedonia – country profile

Malta

Malta – articles

Malta – country profile

Montenegro

Montenegro – articles

Montenegro – country profile

Netherlands

Netherlands – articles

Netherlands – country profile

Norway

Norway – articles

Norway – country profile

Poland

Poland – articles

Poland – country profile

Portugal

Portugal – articles

Portugal – country profile

Romania

Romania – articles

Romania – country profile

Serbia

Serbia – articles

Serbia – country profile

Slovakia

Slovakia – articles

Slovakia – country profile

Slovenia

Slovenia – articles

Slovenia – country profile

Spain

Spain – articles

Spain – country profile

Sweden

Sweden – articles

Sweden – country profile

United Kingdom

United Kingdom – articles

United Kingdom – country profile

USA

USA – articles

USA – country profile

TRANS NATIONAL

TRANS NATIONAL – articles

TRANS NATIONAL – country profile

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] EIRO: JAPAN: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS PROFILE [26 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

European Industrial Relations Observatory (EIRO)

 

JAPAN: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS PROFILE [26 May 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/eiro/country/japan.htm?utm_source=email_webupdate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=webupdate20140528

 

Facts and figures

Background

Main actors

Industrial relations characteristics

Main issues in industrial relations

Workers' rights

Coverage of fundamental rights

Bibliography and links

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] EIRO: USA: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS PROFILE [27 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

European Industrial Relations Observatory (EIRO)

 

USA: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS PROFILE [27 May 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/eiro/country/usa.htm?utm_source=email_webupdate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=webupdate20140528

Facts and figures

Background

Main actors

Industrial relations characteristics

Main issues in industrial relations

Coverage of fundamental rights

Bibliography and links

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] ERM: RESTRUCTURING RELATED LEGISLATION [DATABASE] [updated 26 May 2014]

 

 

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

European Monitoring Centre on Change (EMCC)

European Restructuring Monitor (ERM)

 

RESTRUCTURING RELATED LEGISLATION [DATABASE] [updated 26 May 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/emcc/erm/rll/

 

 

Press Release 26 May 2014

The ERM legislation database has been updated

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/emcc/

 

Eurofound’s ERM database on restructuring related legal regulations provides information on about 300 regulations in the Member States of the European Union and Norway which are explicitly or implicitly linked to anticipating and managing change. The database covers statutory rules, only, and does not include collective agreements or company-level initiatives. The regulations are described in terms of their content, thresholds, involved actors and who covers the cost (if applicable). The aim is to provide an easy possibility of a cross-national comparison of the main features of restructuring related legislation

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information/material contained in the database, Eurofound assumes no responsibility for and gives no guarantees, undertakings or warranties concerning the accuracy, completeness or up to date nature of the information provided and does not accept any liability whatsoever arising from any errors or omissions.

Make your selection by using the filters:

  • country - EU 27 and Norway
  • phase - either anticipation or management
    • Anticipation refers to activities that help to prepare workers or companies for change.
    • Management covers activities required to handle a current restructuring event while minimising social costs. It refers to the steps involved in implementing an organisational change process.
  • type - the range includes, for example, provisions for collective dismissal, information/consultation obligations, notice periods and severance payments, training obligations for employers and employees and regulations concerning working time flexibility
  • threshold - whether the regulation is obligatory in all circumstances or only over a threshold of company size or number of affected workers
  • costs covered by
    • no specific additional costs are involved
    • costs covered by national or regional governments
    • cost covered by companies in general or the specific employer undergoing restructuring
    • cost covered by employees
  • involved actors - including national, regional or local government, works councils, employers’ organisations, trade union or public employment services

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] Brookings: HOW MILLENIALS COULD UPEND WALL STREET AND CORPORATE AMERICA [28 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Brookings

Governance Studies at Brookings

 

How Millennials Could Upend Wall Street and Corporate America

by Morley Winograd and Dr. Michael Hais

http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/papers/2014/05/millennials%20wall%20st/brookings_winogradv5.pdf

[full-text, 19 pages]

 

By 2020, Millennials will comprise more than one of three adult Americans. It is estimated that by 2025 they will make up as much as 75 percent of the workforce.  Millennials’ desire for pragmatic action that drives results will overtake today’s emphasis on ideology and polarization as Boomers finally fade from the scene. Thus, understanding the generation’s values offers a window into the future of corporate America.

 

 

Press Release 28 May 2014

New Paper: "How Millennials Could Upend Wall Street and Corporate America"

http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/fixgov/posts/2014/05/28-winograd-hais-millennials-wall-street-kamarck?utm_campaign=Brookings+Brief&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=12904118&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_hwUVjW87VXVuq3x1t_Wv0W3yefMGiYWaQAkTYrxacEzf0rehbYsrdMGdvi0xCWSK0Adto84Ru2bjiX4E4r8g6f8ABNQ&_hsmi=12904118

 

Among the many eye-popping findings in Morley Winograd and Mike Hais’ new paper on the millennial generation is that their attitudes towards the banking industry make it number one on a list of industries likely to experience severe disruption in its business model in the future. Their paper, the third is a series of Brookings’ papers on 21st Century Capitalism, carefully examines the culture and values of a generation that, because of its size and its unique experience, is likely to dominate American culture for years to come. And the anticipated outcomes for business as usual on Wall Street are not good.

 

Millennials’ attitudes as consumers, as workers, and as investors are unique enough for Winograd and Hais to conclude that Wall Street may well be in for a “millennial reckoning.” For example, one of the studies the authors cite found that almost two-thirds of millennials "would rather make $40,000 a year at a job they love than $100,000 a year at a job they think is boring." Not only do millennials focus on corporate social responsibility, but their lack of trust in the financial sector does not indicate good things for the current governing philosophy on Wall Street. As the paper points out, organizational cultures “that lose touch with the changes taking place in a society pose a clear danger to the future of those organizations.” This does not “bode well for the survival of America’s current corporate governance practices."

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tuesday, May 27, 2014

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[IWS] NSF: SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING STATE PROFILES [27 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

National Science Foundation (NSF)

 

SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING STATE PROFILES [27 May 2014]

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/states/

[go to above URL for interactive map and profiles of States]

or

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/states/download/state_profiles_2014.xls

[spreadsheet including all States]

State Profiles is an interactive website providing access to state-level data on science and engineering personnel and finances and state rankings. State Profiles displays up to 10 state profiles of the user’s choice. Data are available from NSF-sponsored surveys on employed science, engineering, or health (SEH) doctorate holders; science and engineering (S&E) doctorates awarded, including by major S&E fields; SEH graduate students and postdoctorates; federal R&D obligations by agency and performer; total and industrial R&D expenditures; and academic R&D expenditures, including by major S&E fields. Data available from other sources include population, civilian labor force, per capita personal income, federal expenditures, patents, small business innovation research awards, and gross domestic product. All data are available for download. Data cover 2003 to present.

Data related to this publication series may be accessed through WebCASPAR and SESTAT

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[PMX:#] [IWS] GAO: RETIREMENT SECURITY: CHALLENGES FOR THOSE CLAIMING SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS EARLY AND NEW HEALTH COVERAGE OPTIONS GAO-14-311: Published: Apr 23, 2014. Publicly Released: May 27, 2014.

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO)

 

Retirement Security: Challenges for Those Claiming Social Security Benefits Early and New Health Coverage Options GAO-14-311: Published: Apr 23, 2014. Publicly Released: May 27, 2014.

http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-311

or

http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/662727.pdf

[full-text, 75 pages]

 

What GAO Found

Several work-related factors may cause people to claim Social Security benefits early and suggest they may face challenges in continuing to work at older ages. For example, those who worked in physically-demanding blue collar jobs were 55 percent more likely to claim benefits prior to their full retirement age compared to those in all other occupations after controlling for other factors (see figure). Those who were out of the workforce or had longer work histories by age 60-62 were also significantly more likely to claim early. In addition to work-related characteristics, other factors, such as having poorer expectations of living to age 75 significantly increase the likelihood of claiming early.

[CHART-- Work-Related Factors Affecting the Likelihood of Claiming Benefits Early]

Those who delay claiming until their full retirement age tend to have greater income and wealth in retirement and rely less on Social Security than those who claim earlier. Our analysis shows that the median income for those who delay was 45 percent higher after claiming benefits than for those who claimed early, and 33 percent higher at age 72. Although delayed claimers have higher median Social Security benefits, those benefits make up a smaller portion of household income than for early claimers. Even when comparing early and delayed claimers with similar total income after claiming, average household income for delayed claimers was higher at age 72 than for early claimers. However, for both early and delayed claimers, Social Security benefits accounted for an increasing share of total income as they aged.

In 2014, some early claimers, especially those without access to health coverage, may benefit from certain provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) intended to improve the availability and affordability of health coverage. GAO estimates that nearly a million early claimers did not have government or employer-sponsored health insurance before 2014. Of these, 14 percent may be newly eligible for Medicaid in 2014 due to expansion in 25 states and the District of Columbia and 58 percent could be eligible for tax credits that reduce the premiums for coverage purchased through the new health insurance exchanges. However, GAO estimates that 10 percent of these early claimers had incomes below the federal poverty level but lived in states that did not expand Medicaid and had incomes too low for federal exchange tax credits.

Why GAO Did This Study

Deciding when to retire and claim Social Security benefits can be one of the most important financial decisions older Americans make. Despite higher monthly benefits for those who delay, many people still claim Social Security retirement benefits at age 62, the earliest age of eligibility. In 2014, these early claimers will see their monthly benefits reduced by 25 percent compared to what they would have received if they had delayed claiming until age 66, the current full retirement age. At the same time, some early claimers do not have access to government or employer-sponsored health insurance. These early claimers may have been able to purchase coverage on the individual market, but they may have also been subject to denials and rate increases because of their health status.

To better understand the circumstances faced by those who claim early Social Security benefits, GAO examined: (1) demographic and occupational characteristics associated with early claiming; (2) retirement income of early claimers compared to those who delay; and (3) how PPACA changes health coverage options for early claimers. More specifically, GAO examined the characteristics and income of early claimers using data from the Health and Retirement Study, as well as the eligibility for PPACA insurance programs using 2009-2011 American Community Survey data.

GAO received technical comments on a draft of this report from the Department of Labor and the Social Security Administration and incorporated them as appropriate.

For more information, contact John Dicken, (202) 512-7114 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (202) 512-7114 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting, dickenj@gao.gov or Charles Jeszeck, (202) 512-7215 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (202) 512-7215 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting, jeszeckc@gao.gov .

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] Eurostat: BUSINESS ECONOMY BY SECTOR--NACE Rev. 2

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

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European Commission

Eurostat

 

BUSINESS ECONOMY BY SECTOR--NACE Rev. 2

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/Business_economy_by_sector_-_NACE_Rev._2

 

The online Eurostat publication Business economy by sector - NACE Rev. 2 presents an overview of structural business statistics analysed per activity sector of theNACE Rev. 2 classification (see here for an overview per NACE Rev. 1.1 sector, up to reference year 2007).

[Click on Sector Below for Statistics]

1. Mining and quarrying

1.1 Mining of coal and lignite

1.2 Extraction of crude petroleum and natural gas

1.3 Mining of metal ores

1.4 Other mining and quarrying

1.5 Mining support services

2. Manufacturing

2.1 Manufacture of food products

2.2 Manufacture of beverages

2.3 Manufacture of tobacco products

2.4 Manufacture of textiles

2.5 Manufacture of wearing apparel

2.6 Manufacture of leather and related products

2.7 Manufacture of wood and wood products

2.8 Manufacture of paper and paper products

2.9 Printing and reproduction of recorded media

2.10 Manufacture of coke and refined petroleum products

2.11 Manufacture of chemicals and chemical products

2.12 Manufacture of pharmaceuticals

2.13 Manufacture of rubber and plastic products

2.14 Manufacture of other non-metallic mineral products

2.15 Manufacture of basic metals

2.16 Manufacture of fabricated metal products

2.17 Manufacture of computer, electronic and optical products

2.18 Manufacture of electrical equipment

2.19 Manufacture of machinery and equipment

2.20 Manufacture of motor vehicles, trailers and semi-trailers

2.21 Manufacture of other transport equipment

2.22 Manufacture of furniture

2.23 Other manufacturing

2.24 Repair and installation of machinery and equipment

3. Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply

4. Water supply; sewerage, waste management and remediation activities

4.1 Water collection, treatment and supply

4.2 Sewerage

4.3 Waste and materials recovery

4.4 Remediation and other waste management services

5. Construction

5.1 Construction of buildings

5.2 Civil engineering

5.3 Specialised construction activities

6. Distributive trades

6.1 Motor trades

6.2 Wholesale trade

6.3 Retail trade

7. Transportation and storage services

7.1 Land transport and transport via pipelines services

7.2 Water transport services

7.3 Air transport services

7.4 Warehousing and transport support services

7.5 Postal and courier services

8. Accommodation and food service activities

8.1 Accommodation

8.2 Food and beverage services

9. Information and communication services

9.1 Publishing activities

9.2 Motion picture, video and TV production, sound recording and music publishing

9.3 Programming and broadcasting

9.4 Telecommunications services

9.5 Computer programming and consultancy

9.6 Information services

10. Real estate activities

11. Professional, scientific and technical activities

11.1 Legal and accounting services

11.2 Activities of head offices and management consultancy

11.3 Architectural, engineering, technical testing and analysis services

11.4 Scientific research and development services

11.5 Advertising and market research

11.6 Other professional, scientific and technical activities

11.7 Veterinary services

12. Administrative and support service activities

12.1 Rental and leasing activities

12.2 Employment activities

12.3 Travel agency and tour operator

12.4 Security and investigation services

12.5 Services to buildings and landscape activities

12.6 Office administrative, office support and other business support activities

13. Repair of computers and personal and household goods

 

See Also—

§  Business economy by sector - NACE Rev. 2

§  European business - facts and figures

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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