Friday, September 19, 2014

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[IWS] HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020 LEADING HEALTH INDICTORS: PROGRESS UPDATE [19 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention

National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)

 

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020 LEADING HEALTH INDICTORS: PROGRESS UPDATE [19 September 2014]

http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/lhi/progressUpdate.aspx

or

http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/LHI/LHI-ProgressReport-ExecSum.pdf

 

The Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators (LHIs) are a select subset of 26 Healthy People 2020 objectives chosen to communicate high-priority health issues.

Progress generally has been positive toward achieving these targets through the first third of the decade. Fourteen of the 26 indicators (53.9%) have either met their target or shown improvement:

·         4 indicators (15.4%) have met or exceeded their Healthy People 2020 targets.

·         10 indicators (38.5%) are improving.

·         8 indicators (30.8%) show little or no detectable change.

·         3 indicators (11.5%) are getting worse.

·         1 indicator (3.8%) has only baseline data.

View the Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators: Progress Update Executive Summary to see a snapshot of progress for the Leading Health Indicators [PDF – 1.7 MB].

Choose a Leading Health topic below for a summary on progress toward the indicators.

·        

Access to Health Services [PDF - 405 KB]

Clinical Preventive 
Services [PDF - 480 KB]

Environmental Quality [PDF - 272 KB]

Injury and Violence [PDF - 267 KB]

Mental Health [PDF - 246 KB]

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity [PDF - 297 KB]

Oral Health [PDF - 360 KB]

Reproductive and Sexual Health [PDF - 397 KB]

Social Determinants [PDF - 348 KB]

Substance Abuse [PDF - 385 KB]

Tobacco [PDF - 283 KB]

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] World Bank: VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND GIRLS: LESSONS FROM SOUTH ASIA [16 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

World Bank

 

VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND GIRLS: LESSONS FROM SOUTH ASIA [16 September 2014]

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/20153

or

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/20153/9781464801716.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 336 pages]

 

This report documents the dynamics of violence against women in South Asia across the life cycle, from early childhood to old age. It explores the different types of violence that women may face throughout their lives, as well as the associated perpetrators (male and female), risk and protective factors for both victims and perpetrators, and interventions to address violence across all life cycle stages.

 

 The report also analyzes the societal factors that drive the primarily male — but also female — perpetrators to commit violence against women in the region. For each stage and type of violence, the report critically reviews existing research from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, supplemented by original analysis and select literature from outside the region. Policies and programs that address violence against women and girls are analyzed in order to highlight key actors and promising interventions.

 

 Finally, the report identifies critical gaps in research, program evaluations, and interventions in order to provide strategic recommendations for policy makers, civil society, and other stakeholders working to mitigate violence against women in South Asia.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] BLS: REGIONAL AND STATE EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- AUGUST 2014 [19 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

 

REGIONAL AND STATE EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- AUGUST 2014 [19 September 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/laus.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/laus.pdf

[full-text, 21 pages]

and

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/laus.toc.htm

 

 

Regional and state unemployment rates were generally little changed in August.

Twenty-four states and the District of Columbia had unemployment rate increases

from July, 15 states had decreases, and 11 states had no change, the U.S. Bureau

of Labor Statistics reported today. Forty-five states and the District of Columbia

had unemployment rate decreases from a year earlier, three states had increases,

and two states had no change. The national jobless rate was little changed from

July at 6.1 percent but was 1.1 percentage points lower than in August 2013.

 

In August 2014, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 35 states and decreased

in 15 states and the District of Columbia. The largest over-the-month increases

in employment occurred in California (+44,200), Florida (+22,700), and Texas

(+20,100). The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in Michigan

(-9,500), followed by Arizona (-5,400) and Massachusetts (-5,300). The largest

over-the-month percentage increase in employment occurred in New Mexico

(+0.6 percent), followed by Nebraska (+0.5 percent) and Alabama and Georgia

(+0.4 percent each). The largest over-the-month percentage decline in employment

occurred in New Hampshire (-0.7 percent), followed by the District of Columbia

and Idaho (-0.6 percent each). Over the year, nonfarm employment increased in

49 states and the District of Columbia and decreased in Alaska (-0.8 percent).

The largest over-the-year percentage increase occurred in North Dakota

(+4.4 percent), followed by Nevada, Texas, and Utah (+3.5 percent each).

 

Regional Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)

 

In August, the West continued to have the highest regional unemployment rate,

6.6 percent, while the Midwest again had the lowest rate, 5.8 percent. The

South had the only statistically significant over-the-month unemployment rate

increase (+0.2 percentage point), while the Midwest had the only appreciable

rate decrease from July (-0.1 point). Significant over-the-year rate declines

occurred in all four regions: the Midwest, Northeast, and West (-1.4 percentage

points each) and South (-0.7 point). (See table 1.)

 

Among the nine geographic divisions, the East South Central had the highest

unemployment rate, 7.3 percent in August. The West North Central again had the

lowest rate, 4.8 percent. Over the month, the South Atlantic and West South

Central had the only statistically significant jobless rate changes (+0.3

percentage point and +0.1 point, respectively). Eight divisions had significant

rate changes from a year earlier, all of which were declines. The largest of

these decreases occurred in the East North Central (-1.9 percentage points) and

Middle Atlantic and Pacific (-1.4 points each).

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] Eurostat: THE EU IN THE WORLD: A STATISTICAL PORTRAIT [19 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Commission

Eurostat

 

The EU in the World: a Statistical Portrait [19 September 2014]

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page/portal/product_details/publication?p_product_code=KS-EX-14-001

or
http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/The_EU_in_the_world

or

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-EX-14-001/EN/KS-EX-14-001-EN.PDF

[full-text, 178 pages]

 

The publication ‛The EU in the world 2014 – A statistical portrait' provides you with a selection of important and interesting statistics on the EU – considered as a single entity – in comparison with the 15 non-EU countries from the Group of Twenty (G20). It treats the following areas: economy and finance; population; health; education and training; the labour market; living conditions and social protection; industry, trade and services, tourism and the information society; agriculture, forestry and fisheries; international trade; transport; the environment; energy; and science and technology. 

Table of contents

Introduction

1. Population

2. Living conditions

3. Health

4. Education and training

5. Labour market

6. Economy and finance

7. International trade

8. Industry, trade and services

9. Research and communication

10. Transport

11. Agriculture, forestry and fisheries

12. Environment

13. Energy

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] CRS: SOCIAL SECURITY REFORM: LEGAL ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFIT ENTITLEMENT ISSUES [17 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Congressional Research Service (CRS)

 

Social Security Reform: Legal Analysis of Social Security Benefit Entitlement Issues

Emily M. Lanz, Legislative Attorney

Thomas J. Nicola, Legislative Attorney

September 17, 2014

http://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32822.pdf?

[full-text, 15 pages]

 

Summary

Calculations indicating that the Social Security program will not be financially sustainable in the

long run under the present statutory scheme have fueled the current debate regarding Social

Security reform. This report addresses selected legal issues that may be raised regarding

entitlement to Social Security benefits as Congress considers possible changes to the Social

Security program in view of projected long-range shortfalls in the Social Security Trust Funds.

 

Social Security is a statutory entitlement program. Beneficiaries have a legal entitlement to

receive Social Security benefits as set forth under the Social Security Act. The fact that Social

Security benefits are financed by taxes on an employee’s wages, however, does not limit

Congress’s power to fix the levels of benefits under the Social Security Act or the conditions upon

which they may be paid. Congress’s authority to modify provisions of the Social Security

program was affirmed in the 1960 Supreme Court decision in Flemming v. Nestor, wherein the

Court held that an individual does not have an accrued “property right” in his or her Social

Security benefits. The Court has made clear in subsequent court decisions that the payment of

Social Security taxes conveys no contractual rights to Social Security benefits.

 

Congress has the power legislatively to promise to pay individuals a certain level of Social

Security benefits, and to provide legal evidence of Congress’s “guarantee” of the obligation of the

federal government to provide for the payment of such benefits in the future. While Congress

may decide to take whatever measures necessary to fulfill such an obligation, courts would be

unlikely to find that Congress’s unilateral promise constitutes a contract which could not be

modified in the future. In addition, a congressional promise not to reduce a specific level of

Social Security benefits payable to certain eligible individuals would likely not overcome the

constitutional principle, subject to due process considerations, that one Congress may not bind a

subsequent Congress to legislative action or inaction.

 

The calculations concerning the possible future insolvency of the Social Security Trust Funds

raise a question relating to whether that result would affect the legal right of beneficiaries to

receive full Social Security benefits. While an entitlement by definition legally obligates the

United States to make payments to any person who meets the eligibility requirements established

in the statute that creates the entitlement, a provision of the Antideficiency Act prevents an

agency from paying more in benefits than the amount in the source of funds available to pay the

benefits. The Social Security Act states that Social Security benefits shall be paid only from the

Social Security Trust Funds, and the act appropriates all payroll taxes to pay benefits. Although

the legal right of beneficiaries to receive full benefits would not be extinguished by an

insufficient amount of funds in the Social Security Trust Funds, it appears that beneficiaries

would have to wait until the Trust Funds receive an amount sufficient to pay full benefits in the

case of a shortfall unless Congress amends applicable laws. 

 

Contents

Congressional Authority To Modify Entitlements ........................................................................... 1

Congressional Guarantee of Social Security Benefit Payments ...................................................... 5

Congressional Power To Modify Its Own Contracts ................................................................. 5

Congressional Power To Promise Future Deference ................................................................. 7

Payment of Social Security Benefits From the Trust Fund in Case of Exhaustion.......................... 8

Conclusion ..................................................................................................................................... 11

 

Contacts

Author Contact Information........................................................................................................... 12

Acknowledgment ........................................................................................................................... 12

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] EBRI: 2014 Health and Voluntary Workplace Benefits Survey: Most Workers Continue to be Satisfied With Their Own Health Plan, but Growing Number Give Low Ratings to Health Care System [18 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI)

EBRI NOTES Vol. 35, No. 9

 

2014 Health and Voluntary Workplace Benefits Survey: Most Workers Continue to be Satisfied With Their Own Health Plan, but Growing Number Give Low Ratings to Health Care System page 12

http://www.ebri.org/pdf/notespdf/EBRI_Notes_09_Sept-14_OldrAms-WBS.pdf

[full-text, 12 pages]

 

·         Asked to rate the U.S. health care system, many workers describe it as poor (29 percent) or fair (32 percent). One-quarter consider it good, while only a small minority rate it as very good (10 percent) or excellent (1 per-cent). Dissatisfaction with the health care system appears to be focused primarily on cost.

 

·         The 2013–2014 EBRI/Greenwald & Associates Workplace Benefits Survey (WBS) and the 1998–2012 EBRI/ Greenwald & Associates Health Confidence Survey (HCS) find that the percentage of workers rating the health care system as poor more than doubled between 1998?2006 (rising from 14 percent to 32 percent); however, while between 2006?2013 that percentage fell slightly, it jumped to 29 percent in 2014.

 

·         In contrast to the ratings for the health care system overall, workers’ ratings of their own health plans continue to be generally favorable. One-half of those with health insurance coverage are extremely or very satisfied.

 

·         While 47 percent of workers indicate they are extremely or very confident about their ability to get the treatments they need today, only 30 percent are confident about their ability to get needed treatments during the next 10 years, and just 19 percent are confident about this once they are eligible for Medicare.

 

Press Release 18 September 2014

EBRI’s 2014 Health and Voluntary Workplace Benefits Survey: Workers’ Ratings of Health Care System Continue to Fall
http://www.ebri.org/pdf/PR1095.WBS.18Sept14.pdf

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] BLS: EMPLOYEE BENEFITS IN THE UNITED STATES - MARCH 2014 [25 July 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS IN THE UNITED STATES - MARCH 2014 [25 July 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ebs/sp/ebnr0020.txt

or

http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ebs/sp/ebnr0020.pdf

[full-text, 16 pages]

 

Employer-provided medical care was available to 86 percent of full-time private industry workers in the

United States in March 2014, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. By contrast, only 23

percent of part-time workers had medical care benefits available. Access, or availability, also varied by

establishment size: 57 percent for workers in small establishments (those with fewer than 100

employees), compared with 84 percent in medium and large establishments (those with 100 employees

or more). (See charts 1 and 2 and table 2.)

 

Retirement benefits followed a similar pattern as medical care benefits. In private industry, 74 percent of

full-time workers had access to a retirement plan, significantly higher than 37 percent of part-time

workers. Retirement benefits were available to 50 percent of workers in small establishments and 82

percent of workers in medium and large establishments. A worker with access to a medical or retirement

plan is defined as having an employer-provided plan available for use, regardless of the decision to

enroll or participate in the plan. (See charts 1 and 2 and table 1.)

 

Paid sick leave benefits were also more commonly offered to full-time workers and those in medium and

large establishments in private industry. Plans were offered to 74 percent of full-time workers and 24

percent of part-time workers. Similarly, 52 percent of workers in small establishments and 72 percent in

medium and large establishments had access to a paid sick leave benefit. (See charts 1 and 2 and table

6.)

 

These data are from the National Compensation Survey (NCS), which provides comprehensive

measures of compensation cost levels and trends as well as incidence and provisions of employee benefit plans.

 

Additional findings include:

 

   *  In private industry, 65 percent of employees had access to retirement benefits and 48 percent of

      employees participated in retirement plans. In state and local government, 89 percent of employees

      had access and 81 percent participated in retirement plans. (See table 1.)

 

   *  Almost all full-time workers in state and local government (99 percent) had access to retirement and medical

      care benefits.  For state and local government part-time workers, 38 percent had access to retirement

      benefits and 24 percent had access to medical care benefits. (See tables 1 and 2.)

 

   *  For private industry employees in the lowest 10 percent of average earnings, employers paid 70

      percent of the single coverage medical plan premium. For employees in the highest 10 percent of

      average earnings, the employer share of the premium was 81 percent. For family coverage, the

      employer share of the premium was 57 percent for employees in the lowest 10 percent of

      earnings, significantly less than the 72 percent for employees in the highest 10 percent of

      earnings. (See tables 3 and 4.)

 

   *  Access and participation in life insurance benefits varied significantly for full-time and part-time

      workers. In private industry, 72 percent of full-time workers had access to life insurance benefits.

      In contrast, only 13 percent of part-time workers in private industry had access. For state and

      local government workers, 90 percent of full-time workers and 22 percent of part-time workers

      had access. Most workers who had access participated in life insurance benefits. (See table 5.)

 

   *  Paid holidays were provided to 90 percent of full-time and 37 percent of part-time workers in

      private industry. In state and local government 74 percent of full-time workers and 30 percent of

      part-time workers had access. (See table 6.)

 

More information can be obtained by calling (202) 691-6199, sending e-mail to ncsinfo@bls.gov, or

by visiting www.bls.gov/ebs.

 

                                             NOTE

 

More information will be published in September 2014 on the incidence and provisions of health care

benefits, retirement benefits, life insurance, short-term and long-term disability benefits, paid holidays

and vacations, and other selected benefits. For the latest benefit publications see www.bls.gov/ebs

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] EU/OECD: MATCHING ECONOMIC MIGRATION WITH LABOUR MARKET NEEDS [18 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Joint EU-OECD Report

Organisation for Economic Coopertion and Development (OECD)

 

MATCHING ECONOMIC MIGRATION WITH LABOUR MARKET NEEDS [18 September 2014]

http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/social-issues-migration-health/matching-economic-migration-with-labour-market-needs_9789264216501-en

or

http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/social-issues-migration-health/matching-economic-migration-with-labour-market-needs_9789264216501-en#page1

[read online, 382 pages]

 

This publication gathers the papers presented at the "OECD-EU dialogue on mobility and international migration: matching economic migration with labour market needs" (Brussels, 24-25 February 2014), a conference jointly organised by the European Commission and the OECD. It provides new evidence on the role that international migration has played in Europe and in selected other OECD countries over the past decade in terms of labour force; educational attainment; and occupational changes. It analyses the availability and use of migrants’ skills based on an in-depth literature review as well as new data analyses for Europe and the United States, Canada and the OECD as a whole, taking advantage of the International Survey of Adult Skills – PIAAC. Finally, several chapters discuss the potential role of international migration in meeting current and future labour market needs in Europe, in the United States and in the European Union. This work shows that although migration can make an important contribution to labour force growth, its role in counterbalancing the effects of population ageing will depend on the capacity of countries to match labour needs to migrants’ characteristics.

 

Press Release 18 September 2014

Employment: report shows worker mobility key to tackle EU demographic and skills challenges

http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-14-1016_en.htm?locale=en

 

To address the effects of population ageing, the EU will need to close the gender gap and increase the participation of young and older workers in the labour market, but mobility and migration also have a key role to play. This is the main finding of the joint Commission-OECD report on Matching Economic Migration with Labour Market Needs published today.

Commissioner for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion László Andor commented “This joint report with the OECD offers valuable guidance on the serious demographic challenges ahead. Ensuring fair labour mobility within the EU, improving training to close skills gaps, ensuring decent working conditions to workers and better integration of non-EU workers can be part of the solution to population ageing and future skill shortages in the European labour market”.

Commissioner for Home Affairs, Cecilia Malmström said: "It is a reality today that many EU countries cannot meet their labour needs with a purely home-grown workforce. The question is not whether we need migrants but how to make the most of migration. To reap the benefits of migration we need open, transparent, realistic policies that are active on integration and strong political leadership".

Director for Employment Labour and Social Affairs of the OECD, Stefano Scarpetta said: “It may surprise people that we talk about matching economic migration with labour market needs at a time when many European countries face persistent unemployment and a growing backlash against migration. Yet Europe would already be in better shape with a more efficient use of migrants’ skills. Successful integration of migrants and their children, and more efficient labour migration management systems responding to real needs, are necessary to strengthen social cohesion as much as they are to increase Europe’s competitiveness”.

Demographic decline and skills shortages

In Europe the working-age population (15-64) is projected to decline by 7.5 million (-2.2%) between 2013 and 2020, while it will grow in the same proportion in the OECD area as a whole. Under a scenario with zero net migration, the working-age population of the 28 EU countries would be expected to decline even more, by up to 11.7 million (-3.5%) by 2020.

The implications are not only demographic: because the labour market is dynamic and occupations are changing, skills shortages and skills mismatches will become crucial issues in the EU. According to Eurofound's2013 European Company Survey, despite the slack in the labour market, 40% of EU companies have difficulties finding workers with the right set of skills. Overall, available evidence suggests that in most OECD countries labour needs over the next decade will be concentrated in specific occupations – largely requiring high skills, but also at intermediate skill levels.

Against this background, the joint EU-OECD report outlines three complementary policy responses:

1.                  Fostering intra-EU labour mobility to ensure a better allocation of skills

2.                  Better integrating non-EU migrants to ensure a smarter use of their skills

3.                  Attracting the skilled migrants needed on the EU's labour market

Fostering intra-EU labour mobility

The contribution of EU mobile workers to global employment growth is clear: people moving across EU countries have a higher employment rate (68%) than nationals (64.5%). Moreover, by transferring labour and skills from regions and countries where they are less in demand to those where they are needed, intra-EU mobility makes a more efficient use of human resources.

According to the report, policy action will be needed to further remove obstacles to mobility. Fostering intra-EU labour mobility will also require stronger skill matching tools and greater promotion of language learning.

Better integrating non-EU migrants

In 2013, non-EU nationals residing in the EU had an employment rate 12 points below the average among nationals (52.6% versus 64.5%) and the gap was even more pronounced when comparing those who have tertiary education.

The report highlights that this significant waste of human capital could be addressed notably by making it easier to recognise foreign qualifications, making sure that immigrants have access to the most efficient active labour market programmes and providing language training adapted to migrants’ skills in destination countries.

Attracting the skills needed on the EU's labour market

There is currently a low level of skilled labour migration from non-EU countries to most EU Member States, despite the fact that countries have liberalised migration regulations. According to the report, it is notably due to the system of legal admission and the fact that, in most countries, employers are reluctant to hire from abroad. It underlines several options in future actions such as striking a better balance between reliance on employer demand and safeguard mechanisms and improving matching tools to enable employers to identify potential migrant workers, including foreign students.

Background

The joint research project on Matching Economic Migration with Labour Market Needs has been carried out by the European Commission and the OECD over three years. In 2012, a first publication was released: Free Movement of Workers and Labour Market Adjustment - Recent Experiences from OECD Countries and the European Union. Today, the final report on Matching Economic Migration with Labour Market Needs is published, together with a short Policy Brief.

Since the 2012 Employment package outlined the vision of a genuine EU labour market various initiatives have been taken to remove barriers to mobility, such as the recently adopted EU Directives on facilitating the exercise of rights to free movement (IP/14/421) and on acquisition and preservation of supplementary pension rights (IP/14/445). Other initiatives include the proposal to further improve the pan-European job search network EURES (IP/14/26) and the enforcement Directive on posted workers (IP/14/542).

The Commission has also taken measures to support the integration of non-EU nationals, notably through theIntegration Fund. It has also provided policy guidance on labour market integration of migrant in its yearlyCountry Specific Recommendations to Member States where the employment gaps between migrants and nationals are the most pronounced.

Further information

Joint EU-OECD Report 'Matching economic migration with labour market needs'

Joint EU-OECD Policy brief

László Andor's website

Follow @László AndorEU on Twitter

Subscribe to the European Commission's free e-mail newsletter on employment, social affairs and inclusion

Contacts :

Jonathan Todd (+32 2 299 41 07)

Cécile Dubois (+32 2 295 18 83)

Spencer Wilson (OECD, +33 1 45 24 81 18)

For the public: Europe Direct by phone 00 800 6 7 8 9 10 11 or by e­mail

 

 

 

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