Thursday, August 28, 2014

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[IWS] INDIA: INFORMAL SECTOR AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT IN INDIA [online 26 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Government of India

Ministry of Statistics & Programme Implementation

NSS Report No. 557(68/10/2)

 

INFORMAL SECTOR AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT IN INDIA [online 26 August 2014]

(July 2011-June 2012)

http://mospi.nic.in/Mospi_New/upload/nss_report_557_26aug14.pdf

[full-text, 884 pages]

 

Contents

Page

Chapter One Introduction 1-9

Chapter Two Concepts and Definitions 10-41

Chapter Three Summary of Findings 42-168

Appendix A Detailed Tables: Table1 to Table 12 (in CD) A 1-A 654

Appendix B Sample Design and Estimation Procedure B 1-B 8

Appendix C Projected Population C 1-C 2

Appendix D Schedule on Employment and Unemployment (Sch. 10) D 1-D 16

Appendix E RSEs of worker population ratio (WPR) E 1

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] Dublin Foundation: MAPPING YOUTH TRANSITIONS IN EUROPE [24 July 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

 

MAPPING YOUTH TRANSITIONS IN EUROPE [24 July 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publications/htmlfiles/ef1392.htm

or

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/pubdocs/2013/92/en/1/EF1392EN.pdf

[full-text, 112 pages]

 

Author:

Mascherini, Massimiliano; Ludwinek, Anna; Vacas, Carlos; Meierkord, Anja; Gebel, Michael

Summary:

Young people in Europe continue to experience great difficulties in entering the labour market. Although the youth unemployment rate in a few Member States has started to fall, overall 23% of young European job-seekers aged 15–24 could not find a job in January 2014. In 2012, 14.6 million young people across Europe were not in employment, education or training (NEETs), accounting for 15.9% of the entire population of those aged 15–29. This report analyses the labour market situation of young people in Europe, focusing in particular on their school-to-work transition, while also monitoring their more general transition to adulthood. The report also investigates the ability of young people to remain in employment against the odds during the crisis and charts their transitions from temporary to permanent contracts. The report concludes with a discussion on the strengths and weaknesses of selected policy measures. An executive summary is also available.

Contents

Executive summary 1

1 – Youth labour market in 2013 4

Not in employment, education or training 5

Youth employment 8

Conclusion 11

2 – Introducing youth transitions in Europe 12

Spotlighting youth transitions on the EU agenda 12

Transitions as a unit of analysis 14

Investigating youth transitions in Europe 14

3 – Transitions to adulthood in Europe 17

Leaving the parental home 19

Living with a partner and starting a family 21

Conclusion 23

4 – School-to-work transitions 25

Identifying different school-to-work transition patterns 26

Measuring school-to-work transitions 28

A global overview of transitions 42

Conclusion 47

5 – Persistence in employment of young workers 49

Trends in employment persistence of young workers 50

Investigating determinants of youth persistence in employment 56

Conclusion 60

6 – Analysis and assessment of policies 62

Country and case study selection 62

Overview of recent policy developments 63

Analysis of policy measures facilitating labour market transition 66

Strengths, drawbacks and challenges of policy measures 69

Key stakeholders involved in designing and carrying out policies 82

Conclusion 86

Conclusions 88

Bibliography 91

Annex 1: Description of the policy measures based on the Eurofound typology 98

Annex 2: Multivariate logistic regressions for the EU aggregate 99

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] Dublin Foundation: OCCUPATIONAL PROFILES IN WORKING CONDITIONS: INDENTIFICATION OF GROUPS WITH MULTIPLE DISADVANTAGES [20 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

 

OCCUPATIONAL PROFILES IN WORKING CONDITIONS: INDENTIFICATION OF GROUPS WITH MULTIPLE DISADVANTAGES [20 August 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publications/htmlfiles/ef1413.htm

or

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/pubdocs/2014/13/en/1/EF1413EN.pdf

[full-text,74 pages]

 

Author:

Peycheva, Darina; Wetzels, Ruud; Parent-Thirion, Agnès; van Houten, Gijs

Summary:

Job quality indexes are constructed on the basis of such aspects of working conditions as earnings, prospects, working time, and intrinsic job quality. Occupations where job quality is consistently low are labelled ‘occupations with multiple disadvantages’. This report uses data from the fifth European Working Conditions Survey to identify such occupations. It finds that workers in mid-skilled manual and lowskilled occupations do quite poorly when it comes to earnings, prospects and intrinsic job quality, and they report relatively low levels of both physical and mental well-being. However, their working time quality is generally good. In contrast, workers in high-skilled occupations do relatively well on almost all job quality indicators, except working time. An executive summary is also available.

Contents

Executive summary

Introduction

Methodological framework

Key characteristics of work and employment in relation to occupations

Identifying occupations with multiple disadvantages

Conclusions

Bibliography

Annex

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] EWCO: UNDECLARED WORK IN THE EU [10 June 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

European Working Conditions Observatory (EWCO)

 

UNDECLARED WORK IN THE EU [10 June 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/ewco/surveyreports/EU1404011D/EU1404011D.htm

or

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/ewco/surveyreports/EU1404011D/EU1404011D.pdf

[full-text, 14 pages]

 

This survey data report examines the main findings on the supply side of undeclared work around the EU based on a Special Eurobarometer survey carried out in 2013. The report examines the survey methodology, the concept of undeclared work, the characteristics of those supplying goods and services on an undeclared basis, the types of work activities that are undeclared, and income levels from undeclared work, including the extent of the practice of offering cash in hand.

 

Contents

Introduction

Methodology

Concept of undeclared work

People supplying undeclared goods and services

Type of undeclared work

Amount earned through undeclared work

Reasons for carrying out undeclared work

Envelope wages

Commentary

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] CRS: IMMIGRATION POLICIES AND ISSUES ON HEALTH-RELATED GROUNDS FOR EXCLUSION [13 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Congressional Research Service (CRS)

 

IMMIGRATION POLICIES AND ISSUES ON HEALTH-RELATED GROUNDS FOR EXCLUSION

Ruth Ellen Wasem

Specialist in Immigration Policy

August 13, 2014

http://fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/R40570.pdf?

[Full-text, 16 pages]

 

Summary

News of humans infected with Ebola in West Africa, avian influenza in China, polio in the

Middle East, and dengue fever in the Caribbean are examples of reports that heighten concerns

about the health screenings of people arriving in the United States. Under current law, foreign

nationals who wish to come to the United States generally must obtain a visa and submit to an

inspection to be admitted. One of the reasons why a foreign national might be deemed

inadmissible is on health-related grounds. The diseases that trigger inadmissibility in the

Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) are those communicable diseases of public health

significance as determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS).

 

Currently there are seven diseases deemed a communicable disease of public health significance:

chancroid, gonorrhea, granuloma inguinale, infectious leprosy, lymphogranuloma venereum,

active tuberculosis, and infectious syphilis. Other diseases incorporated by reference are cholera;

diphtheria; infectious tuberculosis; plague; smallpox; yellow fever; viral hemorrhagic fevers

(Lassa, Marburg, Ebola, Crimean-Congo, South American, and others not yet isolated or named);

severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS); and “[i]nfluenza caused by novel or reemergent

influenza viruses that are causing, or have the potential to cause, a pandemic.” The INA also

renders inadmissible foreign nationals who are not vaccinated against vaccine-preventable

diseases. Vaccinations are statutorily required for mumps, measles, rubella, polio, tetanus,

diphtheria, pertussis, influenza type B and hepatitis B. Vaccinations against other diseases may

also be required if recommended by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP).

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in HHS take the lead in protection against

communicable diseases among foreign nationals who come to the United States. The CDC are

responsible for providing the technical instructions to civil surgeons and panel physicians who

conduct medical examinations for immigration purposes. Foreign nationals who are applying for

visas at U.S. consulates are tested by in-country physicians who have been designated by the

State Department. The physicians enter into written agreements with the consular posts to

perform the examinations according to HHS regulations and guidance. Foreign nationals in the

United States who are adjusting to legal permanent resident status are tested by civil surgeons

designated by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, an agency within the Department of

Homeland Security (DHS). CDC, in conjunction with Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in

DHS, operates 20 quarantine stations and has health officials on call for all ports of entry.

 

From an immigration standpoint, an outbreak of an infectious disease places substantial

procedural and resource pressures on CBP, which is charged with screening admissions of all

travelers at land, sea, and air ports of entry (POE). CBP officers screened approximately 362

million individuals in FY2013 for admissions into the United States. CBP works in conjunction

with the CDC to monitor travelers and attempt to contain any diseases that may be spread by

travelers coming from abroad. In the current context of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, CDC

has emphasized exit-based airport screening from areas with Ebola, and not screening at POEs in

the United States. At this point, CDC assures that Ebola poses little risk to the U.S. general

population.

 

Congress has acted legislatively on the health-related grounds for exclusion several times in the

recent past. Congress also plays an important oversight role, particularly when concerns arise

regarding contagious diseases or potential pandemics.

 

Contents

Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 1

Health-Related Grounds for Exclusion ............................................................................................ 2

Legislative History .................................................................................................................... 2

HIV/AIDS.................................................................................................................................. 3

Specified Communicable Diseases ............................................................................................ 3

Tuberculosis (TB) ...................................................................................................................... 4

Medical Examinations for Visas ...................................................................................................... 5

Waivers of the Health Grounds.................................................................................................. 6

Vaccination Requirements ......................................................................................................... 7

Port of Entry Procedures .................................................................................................................. 8

 

Tables

Table A-1. CDC Quarantine Stations by City and Location .......................................................... 11

 

Appendixes

Appendix A. CDC Quarantine Stations ......................................................................................... 11

Appendix B. CDC Technical Guidance ......................................................................................... 12

 

Contacts

Author Contact Information........................................................................................................... 13

Acknowledgments ......................................................................................................................... 13

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] CBO: INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RECEIPTS AND THE INDIVIDUAL TAX BASE--AUGUST 2014 BASELINE [27 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Congressional Budget Office (CBO)

 

INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RECEIPTS AND THE INDIVIDUAL TAX BASE--AUGUST 2014 BASELINE [27 August 2014]

http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45668

or

http://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/TaxReceipts_0.xlsx

 

see also--

AN UPDATE TO THE BUDGET AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: 2014 to 2024 [27 August 2014]

http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45653

or

http://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/45653-OutlookUpdate_2014_Aug.pdf

[full-text, 81 pages]

 

[excerpt]

The federal budget deficit has fallen sharply during the past few years, and it is on a path to decline further this year and next year. However, later in the coming decade, if current laws governing federal taxes and spending generally remained unchanged, revenues would grow only slightly faster than the economy and spending would increase more rapidly, according to CBO's projections. Consequently, relative to the size of the economy, deficits would grow and federal debt would climb.

 

CBO's budget projections are built upon its economic forecast, which anticipates that the economy will grow slowly this year, on balance, and then at a faster but still moderate pace over the next few years. The gap between the nation's output and its potential (maximum sustainable) output will narrow to its historical average by the end of 2017, CBO expects, largely eliminating the underutilization of labor that currently exists. As the economy strengthens over the next few years, inflation is expected to remain below the Federal Reserve's goal, and interest rates on Treasury securities, which have been exceptionally low since the recession, are projected to rise considerably.

 

The Budget Deficit Continues to Shrink in 2014, but Federal Debt Is Still Growing

The federal budget deficit for fiscal year 2014 will amount to $506 billion, CBO estimates, roughly $170 billion lower than the shortfall recorded in 2013. At 2.9 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), this year's deficit will be much smaller than those of recent years (which reached almost 10 percent of GDP in 2009) and slightly below the average of federal deficits over the past 40 years. However, by CBO's estimates, federal debt held by the public will reach 74 percent of GDP at the end of this fiscal year—more than twice what it was at the end of 2007 and higher than in any year since 1950.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] ADB/ILO: ASEAN Community 2015: Managing Integration for Better Jobs and Shared Prosperity [20 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)& ILO Joint Study

 

ASEAN Community 2015: Managing Integration for Better Jobs and Shared Prosperity [20 August 2014]

http://www.adb.org/publications/asean-community-2015-managing-integration-better-jobs-and-shared-prosperity

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/pub/2014/asean-community-2015-managing-integration.pdf

[full-text, 158 pages]

Description

This joint study of the Asian Development Bank and the International Labour Organization examines the impact of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) on labor. It highlights the challenges and opportunities that will accompany the AEC, including managing labor migration, boosting productivity and wages, and improving job quality. The report offers policy recommendations for creating better jobs and ensuring that the benefits of the AEC are equitably shared among different countries and sectors.

The AEC will create a single market and production base and new opportunities for prosperity for the region's 600 million women and men. This will have implications for job gains and losses, skills development, wages and productivity, labor migration, social protection systems, and building connectivity. However, unless managed properly, the AEC may not translate into benefits for everyone and could increase existing inequalities.

To realize the full potential of the AEC to deliver more and better jobs, decisive action is necessary, including better management of structural change, ensuring that economic gains lead to shared prosperity, while strengthening regional cooperation and tripartite dialogue. Ultimately, the success of ASEAN regional integration will depend on how it affects the labor market - and therefore how it improves the quality of life of women and men in the region.

Contents

·         Executive Summary

·         ASEAN Integration in the Global Context

·         Connecting Across Borders

·         Managing Structural Change for Decent Jobs

·         Moving Up the Skills Ladder

·         Linking Wages to Productivity

·         Reaping the Benefits of Labour Mobility

·         Policies for Decent Work in an Integrated ASEAN

·         Annexes

·         Background Papers

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] BEA: GDP & CORPORATE PROFITS 2nd Qtr. 2014 (second estimate) [28 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

National Income and Product Accounts

Gross Domestic Product, Second Quarter 2014 (Second Estimate); Corporate Profits, Second Quarter 2014 (Preliminary Estimate)[28 August 2014]

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/gdpnewsrelease.htm

or

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/2014/pdf/gdp2q14_2nd.pdf

[full-text, 18 pages]

or

Tables

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/2014/xls/gdp2q14_2nd.xls

and

Highlights

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/2014/pdf/gdp2q14_2nd_fax.pdf

 

 

Real gross domestic product -- the output of goods and services produced by labor and property

located in the United States -- increased at an annual rate of 4.2 percent in the second quarter of 2014,

according to the "second" estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.  In the first quarter,

real GDP decreased 2.1 percent.

 

      The GDP estimate released today is based on more complete source data than were available for

the "advance" estimate issued last month.  In the advance estimate, the increase in real GDP was 4.0

percent.  With this second estimate for the second quarter, the general picture of economic growth

remains the same; the increase in nonresidential fixed investment was larger than previously estimated,

while the increase in private inventory investment was smaller than previously estimated (see

"Revisions" on page 3).

 

      The increase in real GDP in the second quarter primarily reflected positive contributions from

personal consumption expenditures (PCE), private inventory investment, exports, nonresidential fixed

investment, state and local government spending, and residential fixed investment.  Imports, which are a

subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased.

 

      Real GDP increased 4.2 percent in the second quarter after decreasing 2.1 percent in the first.

This upturn in the percent change in real GDP primarily reflected upturns in exports and in private

inventory investment, accelerations in PCE and in nonresidential fixed investment, and upturns in state

and local government spending and in residential fixed investment that were partly offset by an

acceleration in imports.

 

FOOTNOTE_____

Quarterly estimates are expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates, unless otherwise specified.

Quarter-to-quarter dollar changes are differences between these published estimates.  Percent changes

are calculated from unrounded data and are annualized.  "Real" estimates are in chained (2009) dollars.

Price indexes are chain-type measures.

 

This news release is available on BEA's Web site along with the Technical Note and Highlights related to

this release. For information on revisions, see "The Revisions to GDP, GDI, and Their Major Components".

_____________

 

 

      The price index for gross domestic purchases, which measures prices paid by U.S. residents,

increased 1.9 percent in the second quarter, the same increase as in the advance estimate; this index

increased 1.4 percent in the first quarter.  Excluding food and energy prices, the price index for gross

domestic purchases increased 1.7 percent, compared with an increase of 1.3 percent.

 

      Real personal consumption expenditures increased 2.5 percent in the second quarter, compared

with an increase of 1.2 percent in the first.  Durable goods increased 14.3 percent, compared with an

increase of 3.2 percent.  Nondurable goods increased 1.9 percent in the second quarter; it was unchanged

in the first.  Services increased 0.8 percent, compared with an increase of 1.3 percent.

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] ADB: KEY INDICATORS FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC 2014 [20 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

 

KEY INDICATORS FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC 2014 [20 August 2014]

SPECIAL CHAPTER: POVERTY IN ASIA: A DEEPER LOOK

http://www.adb.org/publications/key-indicators-asia-and-pacific-2014

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/pub/2014/ki2014.pdf

[full-text, 352 pages]

 

Highlights

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/pub/2014/ki2014-highlights.pdf

 

 

See also

Framework of Inclusive Growth Indicators 2014: Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific (Special Supplement)

http://www.adb.org/publications/framework-inclusive-growth-indicators-2014-key-indicators-asia-and-pacific

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/pub/2014/ki2014-special-supplement.pdf

[full-text, 120 pages]

Description

The Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific 2014, the 45th edition of this series, includes the latest available economic, financial, social, and environmental indicators for the 48 regional members of the Asian Development Bank. It presents the latest key statistics on development issues concerning the economies of Asia and the Pacific to a wide audience, including policy makers, development practitioners, government officials, researchers, students, and the general public. Part I of this issue is a special chapter—Poverty in Asia: A Deeper Look. Parts II and III are composed of brief, nontechnical analyses and statistical tables on the Millennium Development Goals and eight other themes. The publication is supplemented by the fourth edition of the Framework of Inclusive Growth Indicators.

The statistical tables in this issue of the Key Indicators may also be downloaded in MS Excel format from this website or in user-specified format at SDBS Online.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] BLS: METROPOLITAN AREA EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- JULY 2014 [27 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

METROPOLITAN AREA EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- JULY 2014 [27 August 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/metro.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/metro.pdf

[full-text, 23 pages]

and

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

http://www.bls.gov/web/metro.supp.toc.htm

 

 

Unemployment rates were lower in July than a year earlier in 348 of the 372 metropolitan

areas, higher in 16 areas, and unchanged in 8 areas, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

reported today. Fifteen areas had jobless rates of at least 10.0 percent and 68 areas

had rates of less than 5.0 percent. Nonfarm payroll employment increased over the year in

327 metropolitan areas, decreased in 41 areas, and was unchanged in 4 areas. The national

unemployment rate in July was 6.5 percent, not seasonally adjusted, down from 7.7 percent

a year earlier.

 

Metropolitan Area Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

 

Yuma, Ariz., and El Centro, Calif., had the highest unemployment rates in July, 29.2

percent and 24.7 percent, respectively. Bismarck, N.D., had the lowest unemployment rate,

2.4 percent. A total of 193 areas had July unemployment rates below the U.S. figure of

6.5 percent, 169 areas had rates above it, and 10 areas had rates equal to that of the

nation. (See table 1.)

 

Decatur, Ill., had the largest over-the-year unemployment rate decrease in July (-3.5

percentage points), followed by Longview, Wash. (-3.0 points). Thirty-six other areas had

rate decreases of at least 2.0 percentage points. Florence-Muscle Shoals, Ala., had the

largest over-the-year jobless rate increase (+1.7 percentage points).

 

 

   ____________________________________________________________________________________

  |                                                                                    |

  |                Changes to Current Employment Statistics (CES) Data                 |

  |                                                                                    |

  |Effective with the release of July 2014 data in this news release, the CES survey   |

  |began implementing new sample units into production on a quarterly basis, replacing |

  |the practice of implementing new sample units annually. There was no change to the  |

  |CES survey sample design. More information about the quarterly sample implementation|

  |is available at www.bls.gov/ces/cesqsi.htm.                                         |

  |____________________________________________________________________________________|

 

 

Of the 49 metropolitan areas with a Census 2000 population of 1 million or more, Detroit-

Warren-Livonia, Mich., had the highest unemployment rate in July, 9.8 percent. Minneapolis-

St. Paul-Bloomington, Minn.-Wis., had the lowest jobless rate among the large areas, 4.2

percent. Forty-eight of the large areas had over-the-year unemployment rate decreases,

while one had an increase. The largest unemployment rate declines occurred in Chicago-

Joliet-Naperville, Ill.-Ind.-Wis. (-2.6 percentage points), and Las Vegas-Paradise, Nev.

(-2.2 points). Birmingham-Hoover, Ala., had the only jobless rate increase (+0.8 percentage

point).

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wednesday, August 27, 2014

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[IWS] BLS: STATISTICS BY OCCUPATION--SPOTLIGHT ON STATISTICS [21 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

 

SPOTLIGHT ON STATISTICS

 

BLS STATISTICS BY OCCUPATION [21 August 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2014/occupations/home.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2014/occupations/pdf/occupations.pdf

[full-text, 23 pages]

 

United States workers held over 130 million jobs in May 2013—but what kind of jobs were they? Over 21 million were office and administrative support jobs, including 2.8 million general office clerks and 2.4 million customer service representatives. Another 14 million jobs were in sales occupations, primarily retail salespersons and cashiers, and nearly 12 million jobs were in food service occupations. Although most of the largest occupations were low paying, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) jobs and other occupations requiring postsecondary education often had much higher wages. This Spotlight on Statistics uses data from the Occupational Employment Statistics program to provide an overview of occupational employment and wages in May 2013, with an emphasis on STEM jobs and occupational data by typical entry-level education required.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] BLS: WORKER DISPLACEMENT: 2011-2013 [26 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

WORKER DISPLACEMENT:  2011-2013 [26 August 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/disp.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/disp.pdf

[full-text, 13 pages]

 

From January 2011 through December 2013, 4.3 million workers were displaced

from jobs they had held for at least 3 years, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

reported today. This was down from 6.1 million workers for the prior survey period

covering January 2009 to December 2011. In January 2014, 61 percent of workers

displaced from 2011 to 2013 were reemployed, up by 5 percentage points from the

prior survey in January 2012.

 

Since 1984, the Employment and Training Administration of the U.S. Department

of Labor has sponsored surveys that collect information on workers who were

displaced from their jobs. These surveys have been conducted biennially as

supplements to the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of

households that is the primary source of information on the nation's labor

force.

 

Displaced workers are defined as persons 20 years of age and older who lost or

left jobs because their plant or company closed or moved, there was insufficient

work for them to do, or their position or shift was abolished. The period covered

in this study was 2011-13, the 3 calendar years prior to the January 2014 survey

date. Most of this period was characterized by employment growth. The following

analysis focuses primarily on the 4.3 million persons who had worked for their

employer for 3 or more years at the time of displacement (referred to as long-

tenured). An additional 5.2 million persons were displaced from jobs they had

held for less than 3 years (referred to as short-tenured). Combining the short-

and long-tenured groups, the number of displaced workers totaled 9.5 million from

2011 to 2013. In the prior survey, which was conducted in January 2012 and covered

2009-11, this group numbered 12.9 million.

 

Highlights from the January 2014 survey include:

 

   --In January 2014, 61 percent of the 4.3 million long-tenured displaced

     workers were reemployed, up from 56 percent in January 2012 and 49 percent

     in January 2010. (See table 1.)

 

   --Thirty-five percent of long-tenured displaced workers from the 2011-13

     period cited that they lost their job because their plant or company closed

     down or moved; an additional 33 percent cited insufficient work, and 32

     percent said their position or shift was abolished. (See table 2.)

 

   --Eighteen percent of long-tenured displaced workers lost a job in manufacturing.

     (See table 4.)

 

   --Among long-tenured workers who were displaced from full-time wage and salary

     jobs and were reemployed in such jobs in January 2014, 52 percent had earnings

     that were as much or greater than those of their lost job, up from 46 percent

     in the prior survey. (See table 7.)

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tuesday, August 26, 2014

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[IWS] EMCC: DRIVERS OF RECENT JOB POLARISATIONA ND UPGRADING IN EUROPE--EUROPEAN JOBS MONITOR 2014 [8 July 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

European Monitoring Centre on Change (EMCC)

 

DRIVERS OF RECENT JOB POLARISATIONA ND UPGRADING IN EUROPE--EUROPEAN JOBS MONITOR 2014 [8 July 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publications/htmlfiles/ef1419.htm

or

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/pubdocs/2014/19/en/1/EF1419EN.pdf

[full-text, 99 pages]

 

Author:

Fernández-Macías, Enrique; Hurley, John

Summary:

This report looks in detail at recent shifts in the employment structure at Member State and EU level, examining the main sectors and occupations that have contributed to job loss and job growth. It finds, for example, that in 2011–2013, the majority of net employment losses continued to occur in middle-paid and low-to-middle-paid jobs in construction and manufacturing. Employment growth remained resilient in high-paid, high-skilled jobs, and knowledge-intensive services have been the main source of this growth. The report also examines some of the likely drivers behind the changing employment structure: technological change, globalisation and labour market institutions. An executive summary is available.

 

 

Contents

Executive summary 1

Introduction 3

Part 1: Recent shifts in the employment structure 11

1 Employment shifts by wage quintile 12

2 Patterns of employment change by worker characteristics 22

3 Conclusions 31

Part 2: Testing theories on what drives job polarisation and upgrading 33

1 Background: Analysing change in the occupational structure 34

2 Methodology 45

3 Descriptive analysis of the different explanatory frameworks 53

4 Testing the different explanatory frameworks 64

5 Conclusions 78

Bibliography 81

Annex 1: Construction of the job rankings 84

Annex 2: Number of jobs by employment shares 87

Annex 3: Employment shares by education quintile 88

Annex 4: ISCO codes 89

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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