Friday, October 31, 2014

Tweet

[IWS] RAND: EUROPE: WORK-RELATED SHORT STATISTICAL REPORTS (6 New Reports] [29 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

RAND

 

EUROPE: WORK-RELATED SHORT STATISTICAL REPORTS [29 October 2014]

 

REPORT

Use of childcare services in the EU Member States and progress towards the Barcelona targets: Short Statistical Report No. 1
http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR100/RR185/RAND_RR185.pdf
[full-text, 71 pages]

This report studies the progress of Member States, and Norway and Iceland, in meeting the Barcelona targets by 2010 by building on the 2008 analysis through examining parenthood and employment, and the cost and quality of childcare.

Oct 29, 2014

 

Melinda Mills, Patrick Präg, Flavia Tsang, Katia Begall, James Derbyshire, Laura Kohle, Celine Miani, Stijn 

 

REPORT

Parents at work: Men and women participating in the labour force: Short Statistical Report No. 2
http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR300/RR348/RAND_RR348.pdf
[full-text, 60 pages]

This report explores gender differences, parenthood and employment by analysing and comparing a number of related aspects.

Oct 29, 2014

 

Celine Miani, Stijn Hoorens

REPORT

Single parents and employment in Europe: Short Statistical Report No. 3
http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR300/RR362/RAND_RR362.pdf

[full-text, 40 pages]

Many single-parent households are led my women which can have an effect on levels of employment. Differences exist between nations and age groups.

Oct 29, 2014

 

Kai Ruggeri, Chloe E. Bird

 

REPORT

Gender inequalities in the school-to-work transition in Europe: Short Statistical Report No. 4
http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR300/RR363/RAND_RR363.pdf
[full-text, 85 pages]

The school-to-work transition has been made difficult by high unemployment for men and women. However, research has also demonstrated that even with considerable gains in education, women continue to have unequal labour market outcomes.

Oct 29, 2014

 

Melinda Mills, Patrick Präg

 

REPORT

Emerging trends in earnings structures of couples in Europe: Short Statistical Report No. 5
http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR300/RR364/RAND_RR364.pdf
[full-text, 46 pages]

This report explores the division of labour in the home and finds that domestic tasks are shared unequally between men and women. Women generally take on a larger share of the domestic work while men, regardless of income, take on a lesser share.

Oct 29, 2014

 

Flavia Tsang, Michael S. Rendall, Charlene Rohr, Stijn Hoorens

 

 

REPORT

Family-related working schedule flexibility across Europe: Short Statistical Report No. 6
http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR300/RR365/RAND_RR365.pdf
[full-text, 61 pages]

Access to increased work schedule flexibility varies across EU Member States Greater flexibility is reported in affluent countries and differences also emerge between social groups across countries.

Oct 29, 2014

 

Patrick Präg, Melinda Mills

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] WOMEN AND MEN IN INDIA--2014 (16th Issue) [October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

 

Government of India

Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation

 

WOMEN AND MEN IN INDIA--2014 (16th Issue) [October 2014]

http://mospi.nic.in/Mospi_New/upload/man_and_women/Women_Men_In_India_2014.htm

 

 

Foreword and Preface

Officers associated

Index

Important Constitutional and Legal Provisions for Women In India

Highlights

Chapter 1 : Population and related Statistics

Chapter 2 : Health Statistics

Chapter 3 : Literacy and Education

Chapter 4 : Participation in Economy

Chapter 5 : Participation in Decision Making

Chapter 6 : Social Obstacles in Women's Empowerment

Chapter 7 : International  Gender Perspective of Development Indicators

Definitions and Explanations

  List of Tables removed in the present publication

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] Census: EDUCATIONAL SERVICES--2012 ECONOMIC CENSUS INDUSTRY SERIES [31 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

 

Census

 

2012 ECONOMIC CENSUS

 

31 October 2014

The first set of detailed statistics from the Industry Series for the following sectors have been released on the Census Bureau's American FactFinder web site: 

Data for these sectors will be released on a flow basis. Click here to view a release schedule, see what has been released, or take a sneak peek at what’s projected to be released in the next 30 days.    

For more information about the Industry Series, click here.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] BLS: EMPLOYMENT COST INDEX - SEPTEMBER 2014 [31 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

EMPLOYMENT COST INDEX - SEPTEMBER 2014 [31 October 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/eci.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/eci.pdf

[full-text, 21 pages]

and

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

http://www.bls.gov/web/eci.supp.toc.htm

 

 

Compensation costs for civilian workers increased 0.7 percent, seasonally adjusted, for the 3-month

period ending September 2014, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Wages and salaries

(which make up about 70 percent of compensation costs) increased 0.8 percent, and benefits (which

make up the remaining 30 percent of compensation) increased 0.6 percent.

Civilian Workers

 

Compensation costs for civilian workers increased 2.2 percent for the 12-month period ending

September 2014. In September 2013, the increase in compensation costs was 1.9 percent. Wages and

salaries increased 2.1 percent for the 12-month period ending September 2014, compared with

1.6 percent in September 2013. Benefit costs increased 2.4 percent for the 12-month period ending

September 2014, compared with a 2.2 percent increase for the 12-month period ending September 2013.

 

Private Industry Workers

 

Compensation costs for private industry workers increased 2.3 percent over the year. In September

2013 the increase was 1.9 percent. Wages and salaries increased 2.3 percent for the current 12-month

period ending September 2014.  In September 2013 the increase was 1.8 percent. The increase in the

cost of benefits was 2.3 percent for the 12-month period ending September 2014. In September 2013,

the increase in the cost of benefits was 2.0 percent. Employer costs for health benefits increased

2.6 percent over the year. In September 2013 the increase was 2.7 percent.

 

Among occupational groups, compensation cost increases for private industry workers for the

12-month period ending September 2014 ranged from 1.8 percent for service occupations to 2.4 percent

for natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations and production, transportation, and

material moving.

 

Among industry supersectors, compensation cost increases for private industry workers for the current

12-month period ranged from 1.4 percent for construction to 4.3 percent for information.

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES.....

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] BEA: PERSONAL INCOME AND OUTLAYS, SEPTEMBER 2014 [31 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

 

PERSONAL INCOME AND OUTLAYS, SEPTEMBER 2014 [31 October 2014]

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/pi/2014/pi0914.htm

or

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/pi/2014/pdf/pi0914.pdf

[full-text, 11 pages]

or

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/pi/2014/xls/pi0914.xls

[spreadsheet]

and

Highlights

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/pi/2014/pdf/pi0914_fax.pdf

 

 

Personal income increased $22.7 billion, or 0.2 percent, and disposable personal income (DPI) increased $15.7 billion,

or 0.1 percent, in September, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.  Personal consumption expenditures (PCE)

decreased $19.0 billion, or 0.2 percent.  In August, personal income increased $50.7 billion, or 0.3 percent, DPI

increased $37.5 billion, or 0.3 percent, and PCE increased $58.7 billion, or 0.5 percent, based on revised estimates.

 

Real DPI increased less than 0.1 percent in September, compared with an increase of 0.3 percent in August.  Real PCE

decreased 0.2 percent, in contrast to an increase of 0.5 percent.

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] MPI/ILO: GERMANY: LABOR MARKET INTEGRATION POLICIES FOR NEW IMMIGRANTS: INVESTING IN THE FUTURE [31 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Migration Policy Institute (MPI) &

International Labor Office (ILO) &

financial assistance of the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Employment, Social Affairs,

 

THE LABOR MARKET INTEGRATION OF NEW ARRIVALS (Series)

http://migrationpolicy.org/programs/labor-market-integration-new-arrivals-europe

 

 

INVESTING IN THE FUTURE: LABOR MARKET INTEGRATION POLICIES FOR NEW IMMIGRANTS IN GERMANY [31 October 2014]

by Carola Burkert and Anette Haas

http://migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/GermanyEmpl-Policy.pdf

[full-text, 31 pages]

 

Press Release 31 October 2014

Investing in the Future: Labor Market Integration Policies for New Immigrants in Germany

http://migrationpolicy.org/research/investing-future-labor-market-integration-policies-new-immigrants-germany

 

Against the backdrop of an aging population and shrinking labor force, ensuring that immigrants are able to make their way into middle-skilled work has become a policy priority in Germany. While the demand for qualified workers continues to increase across regions, immigration to Germany in 2013 hit its highest level in two decades. The challenge for policymakers is how to capitalize on the full potential of immigrant workers and help them overcome the many barriers they face to progress in the labor market. Although new immigrants enjoy considerable improvement in their access to the German labor market, they still encounter significant challenges to advancement. 

 

Over the past several years, federal, state, and local governments in Germany have introduced an array of initiatives to improve the labor market outcomes for new arrivals, both through targeted interventions aimed at immigrants and mainstream institutions like the public employment service. Several of these initiatives were designed with the cooperation of employers, who play a significant role in professional skills development. Chief among the obstacles to upward mobility among immigrants are insufficient language skills and lack of recognized qualification, both of which are being addressed with recent policy developments. There is evidence to suggest that a major piece of legislation in 2012 has made the process of certifying skills from abroad more efficient, for those immigrants seeking recognition of their qualifications. Other initiatives are still very new, making evaluation difficult. 

This report examines how successfully workforce development and integration policies in Germany are in supporting immigrants' advancement from unemployment or low-skilled work into middle-skilled jobs. It provides an overview of labor market conditions and immigration trends, assesses recent efforts to make vocational training and employment services more accessible to workers with diverse needs, and explores new initiatives to incorporate language education into work-focused training. The report concludes with policy recommendations to further support the labor market integration of immigrants. 

Table of Contents 

I. Introduction

II. A Country of Immigration

III. Overview of the German Labor Market

A. The German Labor Market “Miracle”

B. Mixed Prospects for Immigrants in the German Labor Market

C. Labor Market Access Rights Across Migrant Categories

IV. Policies to Support Labor Market Integration

A. An Introduction to the Structure of Service Provision in Germany

B. Employment Services

C. Language Training

D. Vocational Training

E. The Role of Employers and Social Partners

V. Conclusions and Recommendations

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] OECD: SOCIETY AT A GLANCE: ASIA/PACIFIC 2014 [31 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

 

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

 

SOCIETY AT A GLANCE: ASIA/PACIFIC 2014 [31 October 2014]

http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/social-issues-migration-health/society-at-a-glance-asia-pacific-2014_9789264220553-en

or

http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/social-issues-migration-health/society-at-a-glance-asia-pacific-2014_9789264220553-en#page1

[read online, 134 pages]

 

This is the third edition of Society at a Glance Asia/Pacific, a regularly updated OECD overview of social indicators, which addresses the growing demand for quantitative evidence on social well-being and its trends. This report starts with an introductory chapter providing a guide to help readers understanding the OECD Social Indicator framework. Chapters 2 and three are special thematic chapters to address two increasingly topical issues in the social debate: Gender Equality in Education, Employment and Entrepreneurship and Social Protection Expenditure.

 

Related links 

·         Society at a Glance 2014

·         Pensions at a Glance Asia/Pacific 2013

·          

Table of Contents

Foreword
Acronyms and conventional signs
Executive summary
Chapter 1. Introduction to Society at a Glance Asia/Pacific
Chapter 2. Gender equality in the "three Es" in the Asia/Pacific region
Chapter 3. Looking at social protection globally, in the OECD and in the Asia/Pacific region
Chapter 4. General context indicators
Chapter 5. Self-sufficiency indicators
Chapter 6. Equity indicators
Chapter 7. Health indicators
Chapter 8. Social cohesion indicators

 

 

Press Release 31 October 2014

Women still struggling in labour market in Asia Pacific, says OECD

http://www.oecd.org/newsroom/women-still-struggling-in-labour-market-in-asia-pacific.htm

 

31/10/2014 - Gains in education have helped narrow the gender gap in the labour market in Asia Pacific but many challenges remain, according to a new OECD report.

Society at a Glance : Asia Pacific 2014 says that educational attainment and participation among women continue to improve in the region and have helped drive economic growth. But women are still more likely to earn less than men and in insecure jobs, less likely to advance in their career and do more unpaid work.

Although there is large variation across the Asia Pacific region, countries like Japan, Korea and Singapore are top-performers in the OECD PISA assessment. But gender stereotypes are nurtured at early stage of life, and so far fewer girls pursue science and engineering degrees.

This trend also translates into employment. A large gender gap can be still found in areas of entrepreneurship, labour force participation, salary, and the share of part-time employment. To tackle this situation, the OECD says that governments have an important role to play by acting as a role model in advancing equality of opportunity: in many countries, the share of women in parliament increased from 2005 to 2012. 

AND MORE….

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] Oxfam: EVEN IT UP: TIME TO END EXTREME INEQUALITY [29 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Oxfam

 

EVEN IT UP: TIME TO END EXTREME INEQUALITY [29 October 2014]

http://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/file_attachments/cr-even-it-up-extreme-inequality-301014-en.reviewed.pdf

[full-text, 142 pages]

 

Summary

http://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/file_attachments/cr-even-it-up-extreme-inequality-301014-summ-en.reviewed.pdf

 

[full-text, 36 pages]

 

Press Release 29 October 2014

Time to End Extreme Inequality

http://www.oxfam.org/en/research/time-end-extreme-inequality

 

"This report from Oxfam is a stark and timely portrait of the growing inequality which characterises much of Africa and the world today... It contains many examples of success to give us inspiration. I hope that many people from government officials, business and civil society leaders, and bilateral and multilateral institutions will examine this report, reflect on its recommendations and take sustained actions which will tackle the inequality explosion."

Graça Machel, Founder of the Graça Machel Trust

 

Economic inequality has reached extreme levels

 

From Ghana to Germany, Italy to Indonesia, the gap between rich and poor is widening. In 2013, seven out of 10 people lived in countries where economic inequality was worse than 30 years ago, and in 2014 Oxfam calculated that just 85 people owned as much wealth as the poorest half of humanity.

 

Extreme inequality corrupts politics and hinders economic growth.

 

It exacerbates gender inequality, and causes a range of health and social problems. It stifles social mobility, keeping some families poor for generations, while others enjoy year after year of privilege. It fuels crime and even violent conflict. These corrosive consequences affect us all, but the impact is worst for the poorest people.

 

AND MORE....

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] Eurostat: UNEMPLOYMENT STATISTICS [31 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Commission

Eurostat

 

UNEMPLOYMENT STATISTICS [31 October 2014]

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/Unemployment_statistics

 

Data up to September 2014. Most recent data: Further Eurostat information, Main tables and Database. Planned article update: 28 November 2014.

This article presents the very latest unemployment figures for the European Union (EU), the euro area and individual Member States, complemented by an overview of long-term developments since the year 2000.

Unemployment levels and rates move in a cyclical manner, largely related to the general business cycle. However, other factors such as labour market policies and demographic developments may also influence the short and long-term evolution.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Thursday, October 30, 2014

Tweet

[IWS] Census: DYNAMICS OF ECONOMIC WELL-BEING: POVERTY 2009-2012 [30 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Census

 

Tip Sheet, 30 October 2014

Survey of Income and Program Participation: Dynamics of Economic Well-Being 2009-2012 Detailed Tables

http://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2014/cb14-tps82.html

 

This table package traces a sample of U.S. residents and examines how many of them were poor during at least some portion of the four-year period as well as how long their poverty spells lasted. It also looks at how many entered into poverty, how many exited and how many stayed poor during the entire period. The statistics — which come from the Survey of Income and Program Participation — are presented at the national level by various demographic and socio-economic characteristics.

Dynamics of Economic Well-Being: Poverty 2009-2012 [30 October 2014]
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/publications/dynamics09_12/index.html

 

  • Table 1. Average Monthly Poverty by Selected Characteristics: 2009 to 2012 [XLSX – 25k]
  • Table 2. Annual Poverty by Selected Characteristics: 2009 to 2012 [XLSX – 24k]
  • Table 3. People in Poverty 2 or More Months by Selected Characteristics: 2009 to 2012 [XLSX – 27k]
  • Table 4. People in Poverty All Months by Selected Characteristics: 2009 to 2012 [XLSX – 26k]
  • Table 5. Poverty Entries: People Not in Poverty in 2009 by Poverty Status in 2010, 2011 and 2012 [XLSX – 20k]
  • Table 6. Poverty Exits: People in Poverty in 2009 by Poverty Status in 2010, 2011 and 2012 [XLSX – 20k]
  • Table 7. Median Length of Poverty Spells by Selected Characteristics: 2009 to 2012 [XLSX – 14k]
  • Table 8. The Duration of Poverty Spells Across 2009 to 2012 [XLSX – 11k]

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tweet

[IWS] World Bank: CHINA ECONOMIC UPDATE: Special Topic: An Update of China's Fiscal and Tax Reforms--OCTOBER 2014 [29 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

World Bank

 

CHINA ECONOMIC UPDATE: Special Topic: An Update of China's Fiscal and Tax Reforms--OCTOBER 2014 [29 October 2014]

http://www.worldbank.org/en/country/china/publication/china-economic-update-october-2014

or

http://www.worldbank.org/content/dam/Worldbank/document/EAP/China/CEU_Oct29_en.pdf

[full-text, 31 pages]

 

[Highlights]

·         Growth in China continued to slow in 2014, reflecting policy steps to put economic growth on a more sustainable footing.

·         Policy efforts to tighten credit growth, reduce excess capacity, internalize the cost of industrial pollution, and harden budget constraints of local governments accelerated in 2014.

·         Targeted support measures and the recovery of external demand have limited the growth slowdown, but pressures from the weak housing market remain a significant drag on domestic economic activity.

·         The real estate sector, an important engine of growth of recent years, continues to adjust to policies to tighten credit and reduce supply mismatches.

·         The growth forecast for 2014 has been revised downward to 7.4 percent, still meeting the government’s indicative growth target of about 7.5 percent.

·         For 2015–16 average growth is expected to ease to slightly above 7 percent as policy efforts to place the economy on a more sustainable growth path are likely to intensify.

·         The government’s indicative growth number for 2015 will signal the priority that the authorities put on growth and reforms.

·         The current emphasis on meeting short-term growth targets will make it more challenging to implement the policies necessary to shift growth to a more sustainable medium-term path.

·         In an uncertain global economic environment, China’s sizable policy buffers could be reserved to maintain overall macroeconomic stability in case of unexpected domestic or external economic shocks.

·         China’s key medium-term policy challenge remains implementing reforms that support China’s next transformation toward more efficient, equitable, and sustainable growth.

·         A comprehensive reform plan was introduced to put China’s public finances on a more stable footing.

·         Revisions in the budget law provide far greater transparency and accountability for local government debt management.

·         Reform plans were announced to make gradual adjustments to the hukou system to integrate migrants into urban life.

·         Implementing reforms can accelerate China’s economic growth potential, but it will not reverse a moderation of growth over the next decade.

·         Without policy action, the slowdown in China’s potential growth in the medium term could be more severe

 

Press Release 29 October 2014

China’s Growth Continues to Adjust to a New Normal

http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2014/10/29/chinas-growth-continues-to-adjust-to-a-new-normal

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?