Tuesday, October 21, 2014

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[IWS} INC.: ARE YOU A FAILING LEADER? by Samuel B. Bacharach [16 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

INC.

 

ARE YOU A FAILING LEADER? [16 October 2014]

Is business bad or is your leadership style to blame? Ask yourself these five questions

by Samuel B. Bacharach

http://www.inc.com/sam-bacharach/are-you-a-failing-leader.html

 

There is a thin line between a leader who has failed and a leader who is failing. This is a line that you never want to cross. One of the attributes of true leadership is the ability to realize when you're failing. Leadership positions often come with blind spots, groupthink, and a cadre of yes-people.

 

At times, leaders may not engage in careful self-monitoring. In fact, they may confuse inertia for forward movement, mistake stalling for reflection, and mix up procrastination for thoroughness.  In history, failed leaders rarely return. Your challenge is focus on the cues that will let you know that you're on the slippery slope so you can turn it around before you fall off the edge.

 

Here are five questions you should ask yourself:

1.     Are you making more references to the past and future than to the present?Failing leaders engage in the rhetoric of what came before and what will come. They dwell in the quagmire, obstacles, and challenges that they've inherited, and take up the flag of the aspirations, dreams, and goals that they would like to achieve. It's fine to talk about the past and future, but only as bookends for the present. Failing leaders aren't focused enough on the reality of the moment, and they are not looking clearly at those things that need to be executed or those things that need to be immediately achieved. You can reference the past to accentuate the difficulty of moving ahead, and you can use the future to inspire others to succeed with you, but focus on the present.

 

2. Do you over process the problem? Failing leaders often shy away from taking action by engaging in continuous processing. They will study, analyze, and revisit. They will convene endless committees and sub-committees and whittle away at the organization's vitality by processing things to death. They will gather data. They will exhaust best practices. From the outside, it looks like they are on the path to making the most rational decisions and earnestly selecting the best course of action, but from another more subtle perspective, they are simply avoiding action.

 

3. Are you perpetually chasing a huge consensus? Seeking legitimization for their ideas, failing leaders not only look for consensus, but look for overwhelming consensus. They try to get as many people on their side as possible, often overreaching and going well beyond what's necessary because of their own insecure judgment or political paranoia. They try to entice as many partners as they can to join their effort. By dragging as many as they can onboard, what they are actually doing is diluting the essential vigorous core of support. In trying to achieve perfect consensus, they only achieve mediocrity.

 

4. Is your inner circle drifting away? In the early days of your leadership, your inner circle will be enthusiastically supportive. Failing leaders silence their inner circle, creating "yes-people" who never tell the emperor if he or she is wearing no clothes. Over time, the best and brightest will drift away. In your blindness, you may justify their departure, but if examined closely, departures of your inner circle may be the first warning sign that your leadership is failing.

 

5. Is your head full of excuses? Most leaders are smart. Even when failing, they won't publically list excuses or cast blame, fearing the stigma of being a "whiner." Nothing is worse than a leader who makes excuses. Everyone knows this. It isn't so much what you tell others--your team, the board, or your employees. It's about what you tell yourself. If at night you think of excuses and come up with scapegoats to blame, it's time to take an honest look at your leadership.

I often talk about the necessity for leaders to be pragmatic and the importance of leaders having the skills of tactical execution. For this to occur, leaders have to look their leadership with a clear eye and a stoic focus. Acknowledging that your leadership is on the brink of failing is the first step to turning it around.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS} World Bank: DRIVERS OF CORRUPTION: A BRIEF OVERVIEW [15 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

World Bank

 

DRIVERS OF CORRUPTION: A BRIEF OVERVIEW [15 October 2014]

by Tina Søreide

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/20457

or

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/20457/916420PUB0Box30UBLIC009781464804014.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 95 pages]

 

Corruption is motivated by the possibility of securing something of value for oneself and

one s allies. The desire to secure benefits is a human trait and generally positive for development; various forms of

rewards drive humans to get up in the morning, do a good job, and act responsibly. The discussion now turns to the

opportunity to secure more benefits than are entitled to within the existing rules of the game ; specifically, the

opportunity to grab at the expense of society. A decision maker has the authority to influence an outcome that matters

to the briber. For steering a decision in the briber s direction, the decision maker is compensated with a bribe.

The steered decision and the bribe now become assets that usually exceed what at least one of the players would have

obtained without the corrupt act. The opportunity to seize assets through some form of power misuse differs across

sectors, organizations, and decision-making situations. This chapter describes the circumstances in which the risk of

corruption is particularly high in other words, where the drivers of corruption can be found.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


Monday, October 20, 2014

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[IWS] World Bank: GLOBAL ECONOMIC PROSPECTS: COMMODITY MARKETS OUTLOOK, OCTOBER 2014

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

World Bank

 

GLOBAL ECONOMIC PROSPECTS: COMMODITY MARKETS OUTLOOK, OCTOBER 2014

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/20455

or

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/20455/commodity_markets_outlook_2014_october.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 32 pages]

 

Commodity prices are expected to remain weak for the remainder of 2014 and, perhaps through much of 2015.

Crude oil has seen one of the sharpest declines, down more than 20 percent to $83/barrel (bbl) on October 15

from this year’s high of $108/bbl in mid-June. Agricultural prices have weakened as well, down 6 percent since

June. Metal prices remained relatively stable, from the sharp declines seen in 2011. A slowdown in the Euro

area and emerging economies, a strong US dollar, increased oil supplies, and good crop prospects for most

agricultural commodities have contributed to the recent gyrations in markets.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS} OECD: COUNTRY STATISTICAL PROFILE: CHINA [9 September 2014]

 

 

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

 

COUNTRY STATISTICAL PROFILE: CHINA [9 September 2014]

http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/economics/country-statistical-profile-china_csp-chn-table-en

or

http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/country-statistical-profile-china-2014-1_csp-chn-table-2014-1-en#page1

[read online, 2 pages]

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] ITIF: THE GLOBAL MERCANTILIST INDEX: A NEW APPROACH TO RANKING NATIONS' TRADE POLICIES [8 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF)

 

THE GLOBAL MERCANTILIST INDEX: A NEW APPROACH TO RANKING NATIONS' TRADE POLICIES [8 October 2014]

by MICHELLE WEIN, STEPHEN EZELL AND ROBERT D. ATKINSON

http://www.itif.org/publications/global-mercantilist-index-new-approach-ranking-nations-trade-policies

or

http://www2.itif.org/2014-general-mercantilist-index.pdf

[full-text, 59 pages]

 

Countries’ use of mercantilist policies in recent years has expanded dramatically, particularly in emerging economies such as Brazil, China, and India. These practices, such as forced technology transfer or local production as a condition of market access, intellectual property (IP) theft, compulsory licensing of IP, restrictions on cross-border data flows, and currency manipulation, all distort trade and investment and damage the global economy.

 

Collectively, these policies represent a major threat to the integrity of the global trading system and they demand a coherent and bold response from both free-trading nations such as the United States, as well as multilateral trade and development organizations, such as the World Bank, the WTO, and the United Nations. Despite this, many choose to turn a blind eye to mercantilism, for instance, the World Bank’s Temporary Trade Barriers Database 2013 Update asserts that protectionism may have peaked, and is now subsiding. ITIF refutes that claim, arguing that mercantilism is indeed still a major concern not only for the U.S. economy but for the entire global economy and trading system. It’s time the U.S. government and its like-minded trading partners get more serious about confronting mercantilism.

 

In order for the U.S. to take the lead in more effectively combating foreign mercantilism, it is time for Congress to provide the charge and the resources to the United States Trade Representative to develop an annual comprehensive ranking of nations’ mercantilist policies; in other words, a “Global Mercantilist Index”. ITIF's “Global Mercantilist Index” (GMI) uses a new comprehensive method to rank nations on mercantilist policies, while also proposing new policy tools to address the problem.

 

Summary Policy Recommendations:

 

Congress should task USTR with creating an annual “Global Mercantilist Index” and provide additional funding accordingly;

 

The White House should publish a national trade enforcement strategy that reviews the adequacy of U.S. trade enforcement mechanisms with the goal of developing additional enforcement tools and focusing on the worst-behaving countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and Argentina);

 

Congress needs to craft an Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act, similar to that of 1988, that both institutionalizes a Chief Trade Enforcement Officer and Working Group at USTR and restructures the interagency trade process;

 

Congress should increase USTR, the International Trade Enforcement Center (ITEC) and the International Trade Administration (ITA) appropriations with those increases targeted to trade and customs enforcement;

 

Congress also needs to be sure to appoint individuals to the International Trade Commission (ITC) who take trade enforcement seriously and do not simply have a “maximize consumer welfare” mindset;

 

Congress should require that provision of trade preferences, such as GSP and other development assistance, be tied to the GMI and Special 301 Report findings;

 

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Millennium Challenge Corporation, the State Department, and other U.S. development organizations should advocate for a new approach to development economics not grounded in export led high-tech growth;

 

The United States should work with our free-trade allies to restructure the WTO to recognize a change in membership toward countries that do not play by the rules so that it becomes a more effective enforcement organization and not just a market opening one;

 

Trade policymakers should work with the WTO to develop a similar global mercantilist ranking report that applies an international lens;

 

International development organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, EuropeAid and the World Bank should use the global mercantilist ranking report to inform their funding decisions.

 

Press Release 8 October 2014

Who Are the World’s Worst Mercantilist Offenders?

http://www.itif.org/pressrelease/who-are-world-s-worst-mercantilist-offenders

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] OECD: STRUCTURAL REFORMS IN FRANCE: IMPACT 0N GROWTH AND OPTIONS FOR THE FUTURE [in French] [17 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

 

STRUCTURAL REFORMS IN FRANCE: IMPACT 0N GROWTH AND OPTIONS FOR THE FUTURE [in French] [17 October 2014]

http://www.oecd.org/newsroom/FRANCE_ReformesStructurelles.pdf

[full-text, 28 pages]

 

Press Release 17 October 2014

The OECD encourages the French government to pursue the ongoing structural reforms to boost growth

http://www.oecd.org/newsroom/the-oecd-encourages-the-french-government-to-pursue-the-ongoing-structural-reforms-to-boost-growth.htm

 

17/10/2014 - Full implementation of the structural reforms adopted and announced in France would boost potential annual economic growth by one third, or 0.4 percentage points per year over ten years, according to the OECD.

In a report entitled Structural reforms in France: Impact on growth and options for the future, which OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría will present this evening to French President François Hollande at a meeting between the French government and the heads of international economic organisations, the OECD indicates that the reforms that have been initiated and announced will have a significant effect on productivity and competitiveness. The resulting boost to growth will be partly channelled through a higher employment rate.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS} ADB: NEW EVIDENCE ON THE GENDER WAGE GAP IN INDONESIA [online 17 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

ADB economics working paper series no. 408

 

NEW EVIDENCE ON THE GENDER WAGE GAP IN INDONESIA [online 17 October 2014]

by Kiyoshi Taniguchi and Alika Tuwo

http://www.adb.org/publications/new-evidence-gender-wage-gap-indonesia

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/pub/2014/ewp-408.pdf

[full-text, 48 pages]

 

Description

 

Even though Indonesia has been experiencing impressive economic growth, urbanization could affect income inequality among workers. Using the 2010 National Labor Force Survey (Sakernas) in Indonesia, this paper examines how monthly wages are distributed between male and female workers. Empirical results indicate that urbanization tends to benefit male workers more favorably than female workers. It also shows that the gender wage gap in Indonesia is mainly due to gender discrimination. Thus, the paper proposes the implementation of laws to equalize opportunities and wages among workers, especially in the public sector.

 

Contents

 

Abstract

Introduction

Literature Review

Data and Stylized Facts

Empirical Model and Results

Summary Findings and Policy Recommendation

Appendix

References

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] Towers Watson: GLOBAL TRENDS IN EMPLOYEE ATTRACTION, RETENTION AND ENGAGEMENT [October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Towers Watson

Sustainably Engaged

http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Global/Sustainably-Engaged

 

Global Trends in Employee Attraction, Retention and Engagement [October 2014]

How the 2014 Global Workforce and Global Talent Management and Rewards Studies relate to sustainably engaged employees

http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Global/Sustainably-Engaged/2014/global-trends-in-employee-attraction-retention-and-engagement

 

This issue of Sustainably Engaged focuses on current global trends in employee attraction, retention, and engagement from both the employee and employer perspectives. The insights were gleaned from the 2014 Global Workforce Study (GWS) and the 2014 Talent Management and Rewards Study (TM&RS), both recently released by Towers Watson. These two studies collectively represent the views of more than 1,600 companies and 32,000 employees from over two dozen markets globally

 

see more detail at

Balancing Employer and Employee Priorities

Insights From the 2014 Global Workforce and Global Talent Management and Rewards Studies

http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/IC-Types/Survey-Research-Results/2014/07/balancing-employer-and-employee-priorities

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


Saturday, October 18, 2014

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[IWS] ITUC: New! ITUC HEALTH AND SAFETY E-NEWS No. 1

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)

 

ITUC health and safety e-news n°1   |   CSI Salud y Seguridad e-news n°1   |    CSI Santé et Sécurité e-news N°1


Below are English, Spanish and French language copies of issue 1 of the new International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) health and safety e-news publication.

You can also view copies online:
English: http://www.ituc-csi.org/IMG/html/ohs_newsletter_1_en.html
Spanish: http://www.ituc-csi.org/IMG/html/ohs_newsletter_1_es_2_.html
French: http://www.ituc-csi.org/IMG/html/ohs_newsletter1_fr.html

 

The related health and safety news webpages can be viewed here www.ituc-csi.org/OHS  

 

 

[Thanks to Rory O'Neill

Editor, Hazards magazine www.hazards.org

Professor, Occupational and Environmental Health Research Group, University of Stirling, Scotland

Health, safety and environment adviser, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)]

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


Friday, October 17, 2014

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[IWS] BLS: FEMALE SELF-EMPLOYMENT IN THE UNITED STATES: AN UPDATE TO 2012 [16 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

FEMALE SELF-EMPLOYMENT IN THE UNITED STATES: AN UPDATE TO 2012 [16 October 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2014/article/female-self-employment-in-the-united-states-an-update-to-2012-1.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2014/article/pdf/female-self-employment-in-the-united-states-an-update-to-2012.pdf

[full-text, 20 pages]

 

This article uses data from the Current Population Survey to examine changes in the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of self-employed women over the 1993–2012 period. The analysis suggests that these female workers, who represented about one-third of all self-employed individuals in 2012, have weathered recessions relatively well and made considerable strides in educational attainment and earnings. In addition, they have become more diverse in terms of race, family characteristics, and health status.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] World Bank: INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC [15 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

World Bank

 

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC [15 October 2014]

by Ahmad Ahsan, Manolo Abella, Andrew Beath, Yukon Huang, Manjula Luthria, and Trang Van Nguyen

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/20437

or

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/20437/9780821396490.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 247 pages]

 

The East Asia and Pacific region has an international emigrant population of over 21 million people, who remitted more than USD 90 billion to their home countries in 2010. The region also hosts more than 7 million migrant workers, mostly from other Asian countries. These migrant workers account for 20 percent or more of the labor force in economies such as Malaysia and Singapore and thus play a significant role in the economies of the labor-receiving countries. The aging of the population in many East Asian countries will create significant labor shortages leading to greater demand for migrant workers. For these reasons, international labor mobility is emerging as an important development issue in East Asia with important implications for the Bank’s mission of poverty reduction and supporting sustainable economic development in the region.

 

 In this context , this study analyzes the impact of migration on development of the region and how international migration should be managed in East Asia in a way that supports development goals while simultaneously protecting the rights of migrants. The study covers: trends in international migration in East Asia and overarching regional issues such as the links between macroeconomic management and remittances and the role of demographic trends in migration; the economic impact of migration and remittances on labor-sending countries and labor-receiving countries; the migration industry; and the policies and institutions that govern migration.

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


Thursday, October 16, 2014

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[IWS] LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW COMMONS

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

BePress Digital Commons

 

LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW COMMONS

http://network.bepress.com/law/labor-and-employment-law/

 

About

http://network.bepress.com/about/law/labor-and-employment-law/

 

The Digital Commons Network provides free access to full-text scholarly articles and other research from hundreds of universities and colleges worldwide. Curated by university librarians and their supporting institutions, this dynamic research tool includes peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, dissertations, working papers, conference proceedings, and other original scholarly work.

 

AND MORE....

 

The above is part of the

LAW REVIEW COMMONS: The Largest Collection of Free and Open Law Review Scholarship

http://lawreviewcommons.com/

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] Census: AMERICAN HOUSING SURVEY 2013--NATIONAL SUMMARY TABLES [16 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Census

 

AMERICAN HOUSING SURVEY (AHS)

NATIONAL SUMMARY TABLES--AHS 2013 [16 October 2014]

http://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/ahs/data/2013/national-summary-report-and-tables---ahs-2013.html

 

This report presents summary statistical data from the 2013 American Housing Survey (AHS).  Topics covered include single-family homes, apartments, manufactured housing, vacant units, family composition, income, housing and neighborhood quality, housing costs, HVAC equipment, appliances, fuel type, remodeling and repair, and recent moves.

A complete set of summary tables aggregated into a single Excel workbook.

   AHS 2013 National Summary Tables [1.6 MB]

 

 

Tip Sheet 16 October 2014

American Housing Survey: 2013 Detailed Tables

http://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2014/cb14-tps78.html

 

The first findings from the 2013 American Housing Survey are now available in the form of dozens of detailed tables and a microdata file. The American Housing Survey is conducted biennially and, as in past years, provides current national-level information on a wide range of housing subjects. Topics unique to this survey include characteristics and physical condition of the nation’s housing units, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality, and home improvement activities. Specific examples include the presence of appliances, respondents’ rating of their homes on a scale of 1 to 10, and the average cost of kitchen and bathroom remodeling.

 

Topics new to the American Housing Survey this year are disaster planning and emergency preparedness, public transportation, household involvement in neighborhood and community activities, and the prevalence of “doubled-up” households, such as those with an adult child living at home. Specific examples include having an adequate food or water supply in case of emergency, key amenities accessible via public transportation and neighbors willing to help one another.

Results from the 2013 American Housing Survey for 25 selected metropolitan areas will be available later this year. The American Housing Survey is sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] DOING BUSINESS IN RUSSIA: 2014 COUNTRY COMMERCIAL GUIDE [14 October 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

U.S. Commercial Service

 

DOING BUSINESS IN RUSSIA: 2014 COUNTRY COMMERCIAL GUIDE [14 October 2014]

http://buyusainfo.net/docs/x_7740016.pdf

[full-text, 184 pages]

 

• Chapter 1: Doing Business in Russia

• Chapter 2: Political and Economic Environment

• Chapter 3: Selling U.S. Products and Services

• Chapter 4: Leading Sectors for U.S. Export and Investment

• Chapter 5: Trade Regulations, Customs and Standards

• Chapter 6: Investment Climate

• Chapter 7: Trade and Project Financing

• Chapter 8: Business Travel

• Chapter 9: Contacts, Market Research and Trade Events

• Chapter 10: Guide to Our Services

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 


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[IWS] CECC: [CHINA] ANNUAL REPORT 2014--ON HUMAN RIGHTS AND RULE OF LAW DEVELOPMENTS [9 October 2014]


IWS Documented News Service
_______________________________
Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach
School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies
Cornell University
16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky
New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau
________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

U.S. Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC)

U.S. CONGRESSIONAL-EXECUTIVE COMMISSION ON CHINA ANNUAL REPORT 2014 [9 October 2014]
[Report on human rights and rule of law developments in China].
http://www.cecc.gov/sites/chinacommission.house.gov/files/2014%20annual%20report_0.PDF
[full-text, 322 pages]

Press Release 9 October 2014
Chairman Brown and Cochairman Smith Statement on 2014 Annual Report
http://www.cecc.gov/media-center/press-releases/chairman-brown-and-cochairman-smith-statement-on-2014-annual-report

[excerpt]
Overall, the Commission’s 2014 Annual Report found that human rights and rule of law conditions in China did not improve and declined in some areas. Based on developments this past year, the report identifies the following areas that we believe Congress and the Administration should focus on in the coming year:

Rights Advocates. 
This year’s report highlights the Chinese government’s harsh crackdown on rights advocates, many of whom have called for moderate reforms, in a troubling sign that China’s leaders have become even less tolerant of dissent. The Commission held a hearing on “Understanding China’s Crackdown on Rights Advocates: Personal Accounts and Perspectives” in April 2014 to draw attention to the crackdown. Chinese officials’ treatment of these advocates reflects a broader and systematic lack of respect for the rule of law.
Among the advocates detained or sentenced, many in criminal proceedings that failed to meet the basic requirements of due process, include rights advocate Xu Zhiyong, public interest lawyer Pu Zhiqiang, Uyghur scholar Ilham Tohti, and pastor Zhang Shaojie. On this issue, the report recommends, among other things, greater public recognition for the work of Chinese rights advocates in promoting human rights and rule of law, more frequently raising political prisoner cases with China, ensuring that Chinese rights advocates have freedom of movement and are allowed to participate in international forums and dialogues, and urging China to ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

Worker Rights. 
This year’s report shows that Chinese workers still lack the basic right to form independent trade unions, that the Chinese government still fails to effectively enforce its own labor laws in many cases, and that child labor and the use of prison labor in the manufacture of products for export remain serious problems. Given the high percentage of goods the United States imports from China, it is likely that products made with child or prison labor or manufactured under poor working conditions continue to enter our country. The report recommends that the United States, as the largest single purchaser of goods and services in the world, ensure effective implementation of Executive Orders 13126 and 13267 which are intended to combat forced or indentured child labor, or trafficked labor in federal procurement and federal contracts. The report also recommends considering closing loopholes such as the consumptive demand exemption in Section 1307 of the Tariff Act of 1930 and increasing supply chain transparency so that governments, businesses, and consumers can better trace the origin of products.

Hong Kong. 
As noted in this year’s report, China took actions that threatened Hong Kong’s democratic development and freedoms in the lead-up to Hong Kong’s first election of its Chief Executive by universal suffrage in 2017. The Commission highlighted these concerns at a roundtable on “Prospects for Democracy and Press Freedom in Hong Kong,” in April 2014. Given the important economic and social interests the U.S. has in Hong Kong, and China’s international commitments on the issue, the Commission’s report recommends that Congress and the Administration renew the reporting requirements of Section 301 of the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 and express support for Hong Kong democracy by visiting the city and raising the issue in meetings with Chinese central government officials. 

Press Freedom. 
The Commission held a roundtable in December 2013 on “China’s Treatment of Foreign Journalists,” highlighting China’s delays and denials of visas to dozens of foreign journalists and China’s blocking of foreign media Web sites and noted that this is both a freedom of expression and market access issue. Foreign journalists report some of the worst conditions in years, in stark contrast to the situation of Chinese journalists in the United States. The report recommends greater public expression, including at the highest levels of U.S. government, to the issue of press freedom in China and an assessment as to whether China’s treatments of foreign journalists and censorship of foreign Web sites constitutes a violation of China’s World Trade Organization obligations.

Food Safety. 
The Commission held a hearing in July 2014 on “Pet Treats and Processed Chicken from China: Concerns for American Consumers and Pets” which highlighted ongoing concerns regarding the safety of imported foods from China and the effectiveness of the current country-of-origin labeling system in notifying consumers when a product has been made in China. In response to a question for the record submitted to FDA for the hearing, the Commission learned that China continues to delay the granting of visas for additional FDA inspectors, despite reports that China had earlier agreed to begin granting visas. The Commission recommends greater action to secure these visas and to improve our inspection capabilities in China.

Commercial Rule of Law. 
The report notes little progress in China’s compliance with international trading obligations. China continues to control its currency, to subsidize and give preferential treatment to state-owned enterprises and domestic companies at the expense of American businesses and workers, to aid or abet intellectual property theft through cyber and other means, and to provide little transparency regarding Chinese companies, state subsidies, and commercial laws and regulations. There were reports of growing concern that foreign companies were being unfairly targeted, especially for antimonopoly investigations. The Commission held a hearing in January 2014 on “China’s Compliance with the World Trade Organization and International Trade Rules.” The report recommends ensuring that China makes concrete improvements in ending currency controls, subsidies for state-owned enterprises, and other policies that violate China’s existing international trading obligations, as a condition for progress in any U.S.-trade related negotiations with China. The report also recommends that the U.S. government more comprehensively track and make publicly accessible China’s trade commitments under the World Trade Organization, the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue and Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade, and U.S. efforts to secure China’s compliance with those commitments. 

Population Planning. 
The report notes that despite a slight modification in the country’s coercive population planning policy to allow a couple to have a second child if one of the parents was a single child, the Chinese government failed to abolish a policy that itself violates international standards and leads to egregious abuses by officials including forced abortions and forced sterilizations.  The report recommends abolishing all birth restrictions on Chinese families and urges proactive discussions, within bilateral security dialogues, on the potential for social, humanitarian, and regional trafficking problems if China fails to address imbalanced sex-ratios exacerbated by its coercive population policies.    

Religious Freedom. 
The report notes government campaigns against church buildings and religious symbols apparently prompted by growing concern over the popularity of Christianity in China. The report also notes harassment of Catholic clergy, lawyers attempting to assist unlawfully detained Falun Gong practitioners, and bans on Uyghur Muslims’ observance of Ramadan. The report recommends that the U.S. urge China to implement in good faith the recommendations it accepted from the UN Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review of China held in October 2013, including taking necessary measures to ensure that rights to freedom of religion, as well as religious culture and expression, are fully observed and protected.

Ethnic Minorities. 
The report notes deteriorating conditions in ethnic minority areas, from increased violence in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region to harsher security measures in the Tibetan Autonomous Region, where some local governments have introduced measures imposing collective punishment intended to deter Tibetans from self-immolating. The report urges the Administration to address issues of human rights, security, and stability at bilateral security dialogues and any exchanges with Chinese military or police officials by sharing best practices on ways to balance civil rights and national security and to differentiate between peaceful dissent and acts of violence. The report recommends that the Chinese government can promote regional stability by respecting ethnic minorities’ right to maintain their language and culture, and to freely practice their religion, as provided for in China’s Constitution and laws. The report also recommends that Congress and the Administration urge China to allow the free flow of information regarding incidents of violence in ethnic minority regions and to allow journalists and international observers access to those areas in line with international standards.

Areas of Potential Progress. 
The report recommends that Congress and the Administration acknowledge and further inquire with Chinese officials about areas of potential progress noted in the report, including the announced abolition of the reeducation through labor system, potential reforms to the household registration system that could lessen the rural-urban divide, efforts to curb wrongful convictions and increase protections for criminal defendants, amendments to the PRC Trademark Law which increase statutory damages for infringement, revision to the Environmental Protection Law which include provisions that could improve transparency, and efforts to strengthen protections for person with disabilities and victims of domestic violence.
The report contains numerous other recommendations which we also urge you to consider. The Commission and its staff stand ready to assist Congress and the Administration in any way to carry out these recommendations. We look forward to working together on issues of such great importance to our nation.

________________________________________________________________________
This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.


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