Friday, December 19, 2014

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[IWS] GAO: EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DATA: Challenges in Matching Student and Worker Information Raise Concerns about Longitudinal Data Systems. GAO-15-27, November 19. [online 19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Government Accountability Office (GAO)

 

Education and Workforce Data: Challenges in Matching Student and Worker Information Raise Concerns about Longitudinal Data Systems. GAO-15-27, November 19. [online 19 December 2014]

http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-15-27

or

http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/667071.pdf

[full-text, 53 pages]

 

What GAO Found

Over half of 48 grantee states that received a Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems (SLDS) or Workforce Data Quality Initiative (WDQI) grant have the ability to match data on individuals from early education into the workforce, based on GAO's analysis of 2013 Data Quality Campaign (DQC) survey data. The DQC is a nonprofit organization that supports the effective use of data to improve student achievement. In its survey, DQC collected self-reported information from states on their ability to match, or connect the same individual record, between the (1) K-12 and early education, postsecondary, and workforce sectors and between the (2) postsecondary and workforce sectors. However, as the match rate—that is, the percent of unique individual records reliably connected between databases—increases, the number of grantees able to match data decreases. GAO found that more grantees reported being able to match data among the education sectors than between the education and workforce sectors. Further, most grantees reported that they are not able to match data comprehensively. For example, only 6 of 31 grantees reported that they match K-12 data to all seven possible workforce programs covered by the DQC survey, which include adult basic and secondary education as well as unemployment insurance wage records. State officials cited several challenges to matching data, including state restrictions on the use of a Social Security number. Specifically, officials in three of five grantee states GAO spoke with said state law or agency policy prohibit collecting a Social Security number in K-12 data, which can make it more difficult to directly match individuals' K-12 and workforce records.

 

According to GAO analysis of the DQC survey data, grantees use some longitudinal data to inform policy decisions and to shape research agendas. All 48 grantees reported analyzing aggregate-level data to help guide school-, district-, and state-level improvement efforts. For example, 27 grantees said they analyze data on college and career readiness to help schools determine whether students are on track for success in college or in the workforce. Grantees also reported using longitudinal data to analyze outcomes for individual students. For example, 29 grantees reported that they produce early warning reports that identify students who are most likely to be at risk of academic failure or dropping out of school. Data from the DQC survey also show that 39 grantees reported developing a research agenda in conjunction with their longitudinal data systems.

 

Why GAO Did This Study

From fiscal years 2006 through 2013, the Departments of Education and Labor provided over $640 million in grants to states through the SLDS and WDQI grant programs. These grants support states' efforts to create longitudinal data systems that follow individuals through their education and into the workforce. Analyzing data in these systems may help states improve outcomes for students and workers.

GAO was asked to review the status of grantees' longitudinal data systems. This report examines (1) the extent to which SLDS and WDQI grantees match individual student and worker records and share data between the education and workforce sectors and (2) how grantees are using longitudinal data to help improve education and workforce outcomes. To answer these questions, GAO analyzed data from a 2013 survey conducted by the DQC. This survey collected information from states on data linkages among education and workforce programs and on how states use longitudinal data. In addition, GAO interviewed a nongeneralizable sample of five grantees, which were selected based on the progress they have made in matching data and on the funding they have received from the SLDS and WDQI programs. GAO also reviewed relevant federal laws and regulations.

 

GAO is not making recommendations in this report. GAO received technical comments on a draft of this report from the Department of Education and the Department of Labor, and incorporated them as appropriate.

 

For more information, contact Jacqueline M.Nowicki at (617) 788-0580 or nowickij@gao.gov.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] Census: ANNUAL SURVEY OF PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLL SUMMARY REPORT: 2013 [19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Census

Economy-Wide Statistics Briefs: Public Sector

G13-ASPEP

 

ANNUAL SURVEY OF PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLL SUMMARY REPORT: 2013 [19 December 2014]

by Robert Jesse Willhide

http://www2.census.gov/govs/apes/2013_summary_report.pdf

[full-text, 10 pages]

 

Press Release 19 December 2014

2013 Annual Survey of Public Employment and Payroll

http://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2014/cb14-tps84.html

 

Provides a comprehensive look at the employment of the nation’s state and local governments, as well as the federal government. It shows the number of government civilian employees and their gross payroll by governmental function. These governmental functions include, for example, elementary and secondary education, and police protection.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] BJS: CORRECTIONAL POPULATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES, 2013 [19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)

 

CORRECTIONAL POPULATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES, 2013 [19 December 2014]

by Lauren E. Glaze, Danielle Kaeble

http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5177

or

http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/cpus13.pdf

[full-text, 14 pages]

 

Presents statistics on offenders supervised by adult correctional systems in the United States at yearend 2013, including offenders supervised in the community on probation or parole and those incarcerated in prison or local jail. The report provides the size and change in the total correctional population during 2013. It details the slowing rate of decline in the population since 2010 and the downward trend in the correctional supervision rate since 2007. It also examines the impact of changes in the community supervision and incarcerated populations on the total correctional population in recent years. Findings cover the size of the male and female correctional populations and compare the rates of change in the populations by correctional status since 2000. Appendix tables provide information on other correctional populations, including prisoners under military jurisdiction, inmates held by correctional authorities in the U.S. territories and commonwealths, and jail inmates held in Indian country facilities, and estimates of the total correctional population by jurisdiction and correctional status. Findings are based on data from several BJS correctional data collections.

 

Highlights:

 

·         An estimated 6,899,000 persons were under the supervision of adult correctional systems at yearend 2013, a decline of about 41,500 from yearend 2012.

·         The decline in the correctional population during 2013 (0.6%) was less than 1% for the second consecutive year, down from 2.1% in 2010 when the fastest annual decline in the population was observed.

·         For the second consecutive year, the community supervision (down 0.6%) and incarcerated (down 0.5%) populations declined by less than 1%.

·         All of the decline in the correctional population during 2013 resulted from decreases in the probation (down 32,100) and local jail (down 13,300) populations.

·         About 1 in 35 adults (2.8%) in the United States was under some form of correctional supervision at yearend 2013, unchanged from 2012.

·         About 1 in 51 adults was on probation or parole at yearend 2013, compared to 1 in 110 adults incarcerated in prison or local jail.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] BLS: REGIONAL AND STATE EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- NOVEMBER 2014 [19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

REGIONAL AND STATE EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- NOVEMBER 2014 [19 December 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/laus.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/laus.pdf

[full-text, 22 pages]

and

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

http://www.bls.gov/web/laus.supp.toc.htm

 

 

Regional and state unemployment rates were little changed in November. Forty-one

states and the District of Columbia had unemployment rate decreases from October,

three states had increases, and six states had no change, the U.S. Bureau of

Labor Statistics reported today. Forty-three states and the District of Columbia

had unemployment rate decreases from a year earlier, four states had increases,

and three states had no change. The national jobless rate was unchanged from

October at 5.8 percent and was 1.2 percentage points lower than in November 2013.

 

In November 2014, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 37 states and the

District of Columbia, decreased in 12 states, and was unchanged in Idaho. The

largest over-the-month increases in employment occurred in California (+90,100),

Florida (+41,900), and Texas (+34,800). The largest over-the-month decrease in

employment occurred in West Virginia (-5,200), followed by Mississippi (-4,500)

and Kansas (-4,100). The largest over-the-month percentage increase in employment

occurred in Vermont (+1.2 percent), followed by Hawaii (+0.9 percent) and Delaware,

South Carolina, and Wisconsin (+0.7 percent each). The largest over-the-month

percentage decline in employment occurred in West Virginia (-0.7 percent), followed

by Mississippi (-0.4 percent) and Kansas, South Dakota, and Wyoming (-0.3 percent

each). Over the year, nonfarm employment increased in 48 states and the District of

Columbia and decreased in Alaska (-0.4 percent) and Mississippi (-0.1 percent).

The largest over-the-year percentage increase occurred in North Dakota (+4.8

percent), followed by Texas (+3.9 percent) and Utah (+3.4 percent).

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] ADB: [CHINA] MONEY MATTERS: LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE IN THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA [19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

 

MONEY MATTERS: LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE IN THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA [19 December 2014]

http://www.adb.org/publications/money-matters-local-government-finance-peoples-republic-china

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/151515/money-matters-local-government-finance-prc.pdf

[full-text, 150 pages]

 

Drawing on recent technical assistance from ADB, special reports, and the work of ADB staff, this publication offers observations and suggestions on how to pursue public finance reform.

 

The publication also outlines practical actions that can be taken to improve budgeting, taxation, and the system of fiscal decentralization in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Special attention is given to the management of local government debt, the most pressing fiscal issue facing the PRC. The potential contribution of public–private partnerships is also introduced.

 

Contents

 

Summary

Introduction

Standardizing Local Government Financing

Improving the Budget System

Advancing Tax Reform

Matching Revenue Powers with Spending Responsibilities

Concluding Observations and Suggestions

Appendixes

References

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] ADB: IS INDIA'S LONG-TERM TREND GROWTH DECLINING? [19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

ADB Economics Working Paper Series No. 424

 

IS INDIA'S LONG-TERM TREND GROWTH DECLINING? [19  December 2014]

by Patnaik, Ila and Pundit, Madhavi

http://www.adb.org/publications/indias-long-term-trend-growth-declining

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/151494/ewp-424.pdf

[full-text, 29 pages]

 

The recent decline in GDP growth in India raised a debate about whether it is a trend or a business cycle slowdown. The paper finds that the recent growth decline in India has elements of a business cycle and a trend slowdown.

 

The paper observed a cyclical downturn post-global financial crisis due to external and domestic conditions, and that the economy also witnessed a negative shock to trend caused by policy uncertainty. With global recovery strengthening and appropriate demand management policies, the cycle can be reversed. Given that the long-run supply of factors appears strong and institutional capacity for reform exists, policy action in eliminating structural bottlenecks in factor markets can render the negative shock temporary. Thus, trend growth can also pick up.

 

Contents

 

Abstract

Introduction

Drivers of Gross Domestic Product Growth

Estimating Trend Growth

Business Cycle Slowdown

Conclusion

Appendix

References

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] BEA: STATE PERSONAL INCOME: 3RD QTR 2014 [19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

State Personal Income: Third Quarter 2014 [19 December 2014]

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/spi/2014/spi1214.htm

or

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/spi/2014/pdf/spi1214.pdf

[full-text, 11 pages]

or

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/spi/2014/xls/spi1214.xls

and

Highlights

http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/spi/2014/pdf/spi1214_fax.pdf

 

 

State personal income growth averaged 1.0 percent in the third quarter of 2014, down from 1.2 percent in the second quarter, according to estimates released today by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Growth in personal income–the sum of net earnings by place of residence, property income, and personal current transfer receipts–slowed in 38 states and in the District of Columbia. The percent change across states ranged from -0.2 percent in South Dakota (the only state with a decline) to 1.4 percent in Texas. Inflation, as measured by the national price index for personal consumption expenditures, slowed to 0.3 percent in the third quarter from 0.6 percent in the second quarter.

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] Eurostat: USER GUIDE ON EUROPEAN STATISTICS ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN GOODS - 2014 EDITION [19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Commission

Eurostat

 

USER GUIDE ON EUROPEAN STATISTICS ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN GOODS - 2014 EDITION [19 December 2014]

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-manuals-and-guidelines/-/KS-GQ-14-014

or

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3859598/6405291/KS-GQ-14-014-EN-N.pdf/ea1090b9-fbed-4440-80d3-d8b343aac306

[full-text, 68 pages]

 

The purpose of this Guide is to explain to a wide range of users how the statistics relating to trade in goods, both between EU Member States and with non-EU countries, are collected, compiled, processed and published at European level. The different issues are tackled in a question and answer format.

 

Contents

Contents ............................................................................................................................................................3

Abbreviations....................................................................................................................................................6

1 Introduction..................................................................................................................................................7

1.1 What is the purpose of this User Guide?...............................................................................................7

1.2 Which other documents should be read in conjunction with this guide?...............................................7

2 Background information.............................................................................................................................8

2.1 What are European statistics on international trade in goods? .............................................................8

2.2 Who uses ITGS and what for?...............................................................................................................8

2.2.1 Types of users and requirements................................................................................................8

2.2.2 Use of trade data by other statistical fields..................................................................................8

2.3 Who is responsible for European ITGS? ...............................................................................................9

2.4 Where can I find the rules governing European ITGS?.........................................................................9

2.4.1 EU legislation on ITGS ................................................................................................................9

2.4.2 International recommendations and provisions relevant to ITGS .............................................10

3 Scope of ITGS............................................................................................................................................12

3.1 How do you define the areas involved in international trade in goods? ..............................................12

3.2 Which goods are included in ITGS? ....................................................................................................12

3.3 Which goods are excluded from ITGS?...............................................................................................12

3.4 Which transactions are outside the scope of ITGS? ...........................................................................12

3.5 Which movements of goods are included in intra-EU trade? ..............................................................13

3.6 Which movements of goods are included in extra-EU trade? .............................................................13

4 Data collection...........................................................................................................................................14

4.1 Extrastat and Intrastat: two data collection systems for ITGS.............................................................14

4.2 Who provides the statistical information? ............................................................................................14

4.3 How do you choose which data to collect?..........................................................................................14

4.3.1 Using thresholds in Extrastat.....................................................................................................14

4.3.2 Using thresholds in Intrastat......................................................................................................15

4.4 How are data collected? ......................................................................................................................15

4.5 What information is recorded for each transaction?............................................................................15

4.6 When are movements of goods recorded? .........................................................................................16

4.7 How is the partner country defined and classified?.............................................................................17

4.8 How are goods classified?...................................................................................................................17

4.9 Are there specific rules for particular types of goods or movements?.................................................18

4.10 What are the measurement units?.......................................................................................................18

4.10.1 Trade value................................................................................................................................19

4.10.2 Net mass and supplementary quantity ......................................................................................19

5 Data compilation........................................................................................................................................20

5.1 How do you account for the intra-EU trade data not collected? ..........................................................20

5.1.1 Estimating missing trade ...........................................................................................................20

5.1.2 Estimating statistical value ........................................................................................................20

5.1.3 Estimating net mass ..................................................................................................................20

5.2 Why are some of the ITGS confidential?.............................................................................................21

5.2.1 What are ‘confidential data’? .....................................................................................................21

5.2.2 Which rules apply? ....................................................................................................................21

5.2.3 To which data elements does confidentiality apply? .................................................................21

5.2.4 How does confidentiality apply to partner countries?................................................................21

5.2.5 How does product confidentiality apply?...................................................................................22

5.3 What data are sent to Eurostat and when? .........................................................................................22

5.4 When are data revised and considered as final? ................................................................................23

5.5 What are the main reasons for revising data?.....................................................................................23

5.6 What data does Eurostat compile?......................................................................................................24

5.6.1 Unit value and volume indices...................................................................................................24

5.6.2 Data adjusted for working days and seasonal components......................................................24

6 Data quality ................................................................................................................................................26

6.1 Accuracy ..............................................................................................................................................26

6.1.1 How accurate are ITGS?...........................................................................................................26

6.1.2 How is data quality checked and monitored?............................................................................26

6.1.3 What are the main causes of errors in reporting? .....................................................................26

6.1.4 What is the impact of the Intrastat simplification measures? ....................................................27

6.2 Why are there differences in the various sources of ITGS?................................................................27

6.2.1 Why do asymmetries always exist? ..........................................................................................27

6.2.2 What are the methodological causes of asymmetries?.............................................................27

6.2.3 Why is the intra-EU trade balance not equal to zero?...............................................................28

6.2.4 Why are breaks in time series unavoidable?.............................................................................28

6.2.5 Why can European data differ from national data?...................................................................29

6.2.6 Why do ITGS differ from trade in goods in BoP and national accounts?..................................30

6.3 Where can I find more information on the quality of European ITGS?................................................31

7 Data publication.........................................................................................................................................32

7.1 What classifications are used? ............................................................................................................32

7.1.1 Product classifications ...............................................................................................................32

7.1.2 Country classification.................................................................................................................33

7.1.3 Classification by activity.............................................................................................................34

7.2 What is the difference between ‘aggregated’ and ‘detailed’ published data? .....................................34

7.3 Which indicators are available for aggregated data? ..........................................................................34

7.4 Which indicators are available for detailed data?................................................................................35

7.5 What are the basic statistical fields?....................................................................................................35

7.6 What additional statistical information is available? ............................................................................35

7.6.1 Statistical procedure ..................................................................................................................35

7.6.2 Mode of transport ......................................................................................................................36

7.6.3 Eligibility and tariff regimes........................................................................................................36

7.6.4 Trade by enterprise characteristics (TEC).................................................................................36

7.6.5 Invoicing currency......................................................................................................................37

7.7 When are data updated? .....................................................................................................................37

7.8 Does Eurostat publish ITGS only for EU Member States?..................................................................38

8 Data access................................................................................................................................................39

8.1 How can I access data on line?...........................................................................................................39

8.1.1 ‘Main tables’ and ‘Database’......................................................................................................39

8.1.2 ITGS ‘Main tables’ — Long-term indicators...............................................................................40

8.1.3 ITGS ‘Main tables’ — Short-term indicators ..............................................................................42

8.1.4 ITGS ‘Database’ — Long-term indicators..................................................................................42

8.1.5 ITGS ‘Database’ — Short-term indicators .................................................................................43

8.1.6 ITGS ‘Database’ — Detailed data .............................................................................................43

8.1.7 Easy Comext and Comext Analytical interfaces........................................................................43

8.1.8 Bulk Download facility................................................................................................................46

8.2 Publications on line..............................................................................................................................46

8.3 Statistics Explained..............................................................................................................................47

8.4 Where can I find metadata?.................................................................................................................47

8.5 User support ........................................................................................................................................47

Annex 1 — List of goods and movements excluded from ITGS................................................................49

Annex 2 — Specific goods and movements................................................................................................50

Vessels and aircraft – Transfer of economic ownership .............................................................................50

Vessels and aircraft – Processing operation...............................................................................................51

Goods delivered to vessels and aircraft ......................................................................................................52

Goods delivered to and from offshore installations .....................................................................................53

Sea products ...............................................................................................................................................54

Spacecraft ...................................................................................................................................................55

Electricity and gas .......................................................................................................................................56

Annex 3 — Alphanumeric codes...................................................................................................................57

Annex 4 — National authorities involved in ITGS.......................................................................................58

Glossary ..........................................................................................................................................................62

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] Eurostat: KEY FIGURES ON THE ENLARGEMENT COUNTRIES - 2014 EDITION [19 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Commission

Eurostat

 

KEY FIGURES ON THE ENLARGEMENT COUNTRIES - 2014 EDITION [19 December 2014]

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-pocketbooks/-/KS-GM-13-001

or

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3930297/6406919/KS-GM-13-001-EN-N.pdf/c0610a68-22ce-4c1e-9374-8cd85ac98a7e

[full-text, 150 pages]

 

This extensive pocketbook on enlargement countries covers the years 2002 to 2012 and contains tables and graphs on demography, education, social conditions and labour force, national accounts, finance and prices, agriculture, energy, industry, construction and services, transport, communications and information society, as well as external trade, research and development and environment. A short commentary on the data and methodological notes are also included.

 

Table of contents

Acknowledgements .. .....................................................................4

Introduction ....................................................................................7

Guide.................................................................................................9

Chapter 1 — Demography .......................... ................................15

Chapter 2 — Education................................................................25

Chapter 3 — Social indicators....................................................37

Chapter 4 — Labour force ...........................................................45

Chapter 5 — National accounts..................................................57

Chapter 6 — Finance and prices................................................65

Chapter 7 — International trade................................................77

Chapter 8 — Agriculture.............................................................87

Chapter 9 — Energy .....................................................................97

Chapter 10 — Industry and services .......................................109

Chapter 11 — Transport............................................................ 117

Chapter 12 — Communication and Information Society ...127

Chapter 13 — Research & development..................................135

Chapter 14 — Environment......................................................141

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Thursday, December 18, 2014

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[IWS] CBO: TAXING CAPITAL INCOME: EFFECTIVE MARGINAL TAX RATE UNDER 2014 LAW AND SELECTED POLICY OPTIONS [18 December 2014]

 

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Congressional Budget Office (CBO)

 

TAXING CAPITAL INCOME: EFFECTIVE MARGINAL TAX RATE UNDER 2014 LAW AND SELECTED POLICY OPTIONS [18 December 2014]

http://www.cbo.gov/publication/49817?

or

http://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/49817-Taxing_Capital_Income_0.pdf

[full-text, 53 pages]

 

[excerpt]

The federal tax treatment of capital income affects investment incentives, both for the amounts invested and for allocations among assets. When tax rates are high, investors require higher before-tax rates of return and thus forgo investments with lower returns that they otherwise would have made. Current law produces significant variations in the taxation of capital income from different investments, thus leading investors to require higher before-tax rates of return on some investments than on others. Those differences reduce economic efficiency—the extent to which resources are allocated to maximize before-tax value.

An effective marginal tax rate (hereafter referred to as an effective tax rate or ETR) measures an investor’s tax burden on returns from an investment. An ETR combines a statutory tax rate with other features of the tax code (various deductions and credits, for example) into a single percentage that applies to before-tax capital income realized over an investment’s lifetime. (In this report, capital income consists of receipts minus the cost of goods sold, operating expenses, interest paid, and an allowance equal to the decline in value of capital assets because of economic depreciation—that is, wear and tear or obsolescence.) The higher the ETR, the greater the distortion in investments, holding all else equal; thus, the greater the variation (or nonuniformity) of ETRs among different investments, the less likely it is that resources will be used efficiently.

For this report, CBO estimated ETRs on income from marginal investments (those expected to earn just enough, after taxes, to attract investors) in such tangible capital assets as equipment, structures, land, and inventories (assets held for resale). In considering both corporate and individual taxation—but only with respect to the permanent features of federal income tax law in 2014—CBO arrived at the following conclusions:

·         The ETR on capital income is, on average, 18 percent;

·         The ETR on income from owner-occupied housing is close to zero; and

·         The ETR on capital income generated by businesses is, on average, 29 percent.

Contents

Summary 1

How Do Effective Tax Rates Differ Among Investments? 1

How Would Various Policy Options Change Effective Tax Rates? 3

The Taxation of Capital Income 4

Income of C Corporations 4

Income of Other Types of Business Entities 5

Income From Owner-Occupied Housing 5

Capital Income of Individual Investors 6

Measuring Effective Tax Rates on Capital Income 6

Estimating ETRs and Their Dispersion 7

Uses and Limitations of the ETR Framework 7

Simplifications of the Analysis 8

Effective Tax Rates Under Current Law 9

Business ETRs by Form of Organization and Source of Financing 9

Variation Among Business ETRs, by Asset Type 11

Variation Among Business ETRs, by Industry 13

ETRs on Owner-Occupied Housing 13

Policy Options for the Taxation of Capital Income 14

CBO’s Approach to Evaluating the Options 15

Options That Would Reduce the Tax on Capital Income 16

Options That Would Reduce or Eliminate Tax Preferences for Capital Income 19

Options That Would Narrow Specific Disparities Among Tax Rates Without

Changing the Overall ETR 23

Appendix A: CBO’s Methodology for Estimating Effective Tax Rates 27

Appendix B: The Sensitivity of Estimates of Effective Tax Rates to Certain Analytical Choices 37

Appendix C: Changes in CBO’s Estimates of Effective Tax Rates Since 2005 45

List of Tables and Figures 48

About This Document 49

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] USITC: DIRECTORY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE ANALYST COMMODITY/SERVICE ASSIGNMENTS [December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC)

USITC Publication 4510

 

DIRECTORY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE ANALYST COMMODITY/SERVICE ASSIGNMENTS [December 2014]

http://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/commodity_analyst_directory.pdf

[full-text, 80 pages]

 

The international trade analysts track the thousands of raw materials and finished products traded by the United States, as well as specific U.S. services that are the focus of increasing attention in international trade.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] USITC: INTERNET USE AND OPENNESS TO TRADE [December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC)

 

INTERNET USE AND OPENNESS TO TRADE [December 2014]

by David Riker

http://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/ec201412c.pdf

[full-text, 24 pages]

 

Abstract

This paper presents an econometric model that links the number of broadband users in a country

to its volume of international trade in goods and services. The model indicates that the growth in

broadband use between 2000 and 2011 increased a country’s openness to trade (measured by the

ratio of their total trade to their GDP) by 4.21 percentage points on average, with much larger

effects in high income countries (a 10.21 percentage point increase on average) than in developing

countries (a 1.67 percentage point increase on average). We also use the econometric model to

project how each country’s openness to trade will be affected by expected future growth in

broadband use: we project that the trade-to-GDP ratios will increase an additional 6.88 percentage

points on average in the high income countries and an additional 1.67 percentage points on average

in the developing countries due to further growth in broadband use over the next five years.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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[IWS] ADB: ASIAN DEVELOPMENT OUTLOOK 2014 SUPPLEMENT: GROWTH HESITATES IN DEVELOPING ASIA [17 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

 

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT OUTLOOK 2014 SUPPLEMENT: GROWTH HESITATES IN DEVELOPING ASIA [17 December 2014]

http://www.adb.org/publications/asian-development-outlook-2014-supplement-growth-hesitates-developing-asia

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/151010/ado-supplement-december-2014.pdf

[full-text, 6 pages]

 

The growth outlook for developing Asia remains steady, with the aggregate gross domestic product expected to grow by 6.1% in 2014, the same as in the previous year but a slight downward revision from the 6.2% forecast in ADO 2014 Update.

 

The regional economy is projected to expand a bit more quickly in 2015 at 6.2%, but still 0.2 percentage points short of the Update forecast. Growth projections are revised down for Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. They are unchanged for South Asia and revised up for the Pacific.

 

While domestic factors also contribute to the softening outlook, there is upside growth potential from falling oil prices.

 

Highlights

Some of the report's highlights include the following:

 

·         Growth in developing Asia lost some momentum in the second half of 2014 but is still roughly in line with projections in Asian Development Outlook 2014 Update. This Supplement sees the region expanding by 6.1% in 2014 and a slight pickup to 6.2% in 2015.

·         In the People’s Republic of China, growth moderated somewhat more than expected, but the economy should still expand by 7.4% in 2014, or 0.1 percentage points off of the earlier forecast, and by 7.2% in 2015. East Asia is now forecast to grow by 6.6% in 2014 and 6.5% in 2015.

·         Expectations remain high for reform-driven growth in India. This Supplement maintains earlier forecasts for growth at 5.5% in fiscal year 2014 and 6.3% in FY2015. The outlook for South Asia as a whole is unchanged at 5.4% expansion in 2014, picking up to 6.1% in 2015.

·         Growth in several large Southeast Asian economies disappointed in the first 9 months of 2014, prompting slight reductions to projections for Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Subregional growth is expected to reach 4.4% in 2014 and 5.2% in 2015.

·         Economic malaise in the Russian Federation is crimping remittances and trade in Central Asia, even as falling oil prices hurt the subregion’s energy producers. Growth is now projected at 5.1% in 2014 and 5.4% in 2015, revised down by 0.5 percentage points for each year.

·         Several governments have taken advantage of sharply lower global oil prices to rein in costly fuel subsidies, offsetting their mitigation of inflation. Still, inflation in developing Asia is expected to be somewhat lower than previously forecast, at 3.2% in 2014 and 3.5% in 2015.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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