Monday, January 19, 2015

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[IWS] IADB: Innovations in Public Service Delivery: Issue No 01: Can 311 Call Centers Improve Service Delivery? Lessons from New York and Chicago [January 2015]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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Inter-American Development Bank (IADB)

Discussion Paper 371

 

Innovations in Public Service Delivery: Issue No 01: Can 311 Call Centers Improve Service Delivery? Lessons from New York and Chicago [January 2015]

by Jane Wiseman

http://publications.iadb.org/handle/11319/6765?scope=123456789/1&thumbnail=true&rpp=5&page=1&group_by=none&etal=0

or

http://publications.iadb.org/bitstream/handle/11319/6765/ICS_DP_Can_311_Call_Centers_Improve_Service_Delivery%20final.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 40 pages]

 

This paper is the first of the IDB's "Innovations in Public Service Delivery" series, which identifies and analyzes innovative experiences of promising practices in Latin America and the Caribbean and around the world to improve the quality and delivery of public services. It presents the 311 Programs in New York City and Chicago, leading 311 centers in the United States. "311" is the universal toll-free number that provides citizens with a single point of entry to a wide array of information and services in major cities. In the cities studied, these centers have evolved to support new models of service delivery management. This publication provides an overview of these programs, analyzing their design and implementation, results, and impacts, and identifying their success factors. The final section consolidates the lessons learned from these experiences, highlighting what policymakers and public officials should consider when developing similar solutions.

 

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