Tuesday, December 16, 2014

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[IWS] GPO: REPORT ON TORTURE AND THE CIA: SENATE INTELLIGENCE COMMITTEE REPORT 113-288 [9 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service
_______________________________
Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach
School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies
Cornell University
16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky
New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau
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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO)

S. Rept. 113-288
Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture and the CIA [9 December 2014]
[full-text, 712 pages]

[excerpt]
The Committee Study, including the now-declassified Executive Summary and
Findings and Conclusions, as updated is now final and represents the official views
of the Committee. This and future Administrations should use this Study to guide
future programs, correct past mistakes, increase oversight of CIA representations
to policymakers, and ensure coercive interrogation practices are not used by our
government again.

Description

The United States Senate Intelligence Committee Report on CIA Defense and Interrogation Program has the official title -- Report of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Committee Study of the Central Intelligence Agency’s Detention and Interrogation Program together with Foreword by Chairman Feinstein and Additional and Minority Views --  provides key primary source documentation of the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program.

In this official and authentic report, you will find the findings and conclusions from the United States Senate Intelligence Committee Study that documents the abuses and countless mistakes made between late 2001 and early 2009.   Many U.S. news reports have been highlighting and showcasing panel debates with this report that they refer to as the “Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture”.

This official and authentic Executive Summary of the Study provides a significant amount of new information, based on CIA and other documents, to what has already been made public by former President George W. Bush and President Barack Obama Administrations, as well as non-governmental organizations and the news media.

This 712-page Executive Summary includes the Committee’s findings and conclusions of CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program, is divided into the following seven key topics:

• Background on the Committee Study
• Overall History and Operation of the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program
• Intelligence Acquired and CIA Representations on the Effectiveness of the CIA’s Enhanced Interrogation Techniques to Multiple Constituencies
• Overview of CIA Representations to the Media While the Program Was Classified
• Review of the CIA Representations to the Department of Justice
• Review of CIA Representations to the Congress
• CIA Destruction of Interrogation Videotapes Leads to Committee Investigation; Committee Votes 14-1 for Expansive Terms of Reference to Study the CIA’s detention and Interrogation Program

This report also includes three appendices covering the terms of reference, the CIA’s list of detainees from 2002-2008, and an example of inaccurate testimony to the committee from April 12, 2007.

International Relations, political science, and criminal justice students, as well as scholars that may research the history of interrogation practices may find many helpful insights within this report.

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.












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