Monday, December 15, 2014

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[IWS] Eurostat: LABOUR COST STRUCTURAL STATISTICS--LEVELS & CHANGES [15 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Commission

Eurostat

 

LABOUR COST STRUCTURAL STATISTICS--LEVELS [15 December 2014]

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Labour_cost_structural_statistics_-_levels

 

Data from November 2014, most recent data: Further Eurostat information, Main tables and Database.

This article is based on the latest vintage of the 4-yearly Labour cost survey (LCS), with reference year 2012. Another article, highlighting the changes between 2008 and 2012 is available here: Labour cost structural statistics - changes.

In 2012, the mean hourly labour cost in the European Union (EU) was EUR 24.2 per hour worked. In the economic sector "financial and insurance activities" (NACERev.2 Section K) it was 70 % more (EUR 41.2), while in the economic sector "accommodation and food service activities" (NACE Rev. 2 Section 1) it was 41 % less (EUR 14.4).

On average, full-time employees worked 33.4 hours per calendar week (i.e. all weeks of the year including e.g. holidays periods), while part-time employees worked 17.2 hours, slightly more than 50 % of full-timers.

For hours paid, which include holidays and paid sick leave but exclude unpaid overtime, the EU average for full time employees was 37.8 hours per calendar week.

Wages and salaries, including social contributions payable by employees, represent the largest share (76 %) of total labour costs, followed by social contributions paid by employers (22 %). The remainder (2 %) is absorbed by vocation training costs, other expenditure and taxes less subsidies on labour.

 

LABOUR COST STRUCTURAL STATISTICS--CHANGES [15 December 2014]

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Labour_cost_structural_statistics_-_changes

 

Data from November 2014, most recent data: Further Eurostat information, Main tables and Database.

This article is based on the two latest vintages of the 4-yearly Labour cost survey (LCS), with reference years 2008 and 2012, highlighting changes in hours worked and hourly labour costs between the two reference years. For 2012 levels article see: Labour cost structural statistics - levels.

In 2012, the mean hourly labour cost in the European Union (EU) was EUR 24.2 per hour worked, 11 % more than in 2008 (EUR 21.7). On average, EU employeesworked 2 % less hours in 2012 than in 2008, with significant differences across countries. Large decreases of more than 15 % were recorded for Latvia, Spain, Portugal, Ireland and Lithuania, while other countries recorded an increase (Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Sweden, Cyprus and the United Kingdom).

Despite the drop in hours worked, the number of employees in the EU remained stable from 2008, while it increased by 2 % in the euro area (EA).

 

 

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