Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Tweet

[IWS] ADB: ADB TRADE FINANCE GAP, GROWTH, AND JOBS SURVEY [16 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

ADB Briefs No. 25

 

ADB TRADE FINANCE GAP, GROWTH, AND JOBS SURVEY [16 December 2014]

by DiCaprio, Alisa; Beck, Steven; Daquis, John Carlo

http://www.adb.org/publications/adb-trade-finance-gap-growth-and-jobs-survey

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/150811/adb-trade-finance-gap-growth.pdf

[full-text, 5 pages]

 

Trade finance gaps are a persistent feature of the global trade landscape. Yet the reasons gaps exist and the populations which are most impacted vary both temporally and geographically.

 

In 2013, ADB, in cooperation with partner organizations, surveyed financial service providers and companies involved in international trade about their use of trade finance. This brief introduces the key points of ADB’s second effort to quantify the adequacy of global trade finance and its impact on economic growth and job creation.

 

Key Points

·         Market gaps for trade finance persist in 2013

·         Gaps inhibit economic growth and job creation

·         AML/KYC regulations are a significant contributor to the trade finance shortfalls

·         Companies lack awareness of trade finance options and innovations

 

Conclusions

Significant trade finance gaps remain. SMEs continue to be credit constrained in every region. Narrowing of trade finance gaps will lead to more economic growth and job creation. Unintended consequences of (overlapping) regulatory requirements, particularly with respect to financial crimes compliance, are contributing to the gap and have the most negative impact on developing countries with weak financial systems.

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Links to this post:

Create a Link



<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?