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[IWS] ILO: LABOUR MARKET TRANSITIONS OF YOUNG WOMEN AND MEN IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC [27 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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International Labour Organization (ILO)

 

LABOUR MARKET TRANSITIONS OF YOUNG WOMEN AND MEN IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC [27 August 2014]

http://www.ilo.org/employment/areas/youth-employment/work-for-youth/publications/regional-reports/WCMS_302559/lang--en/index.htm

or

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_emp/documents/publication/wcms_302559.pdf

[full-text, 87 pages]

 

This report presents the results of the School-to-work transition surveys (SWTS) implemented in five countries in the Asia-Pacific region – Bangladesh, Cambodia, Nepal, Samoa and Viet Nam – in 2012 or 2013. The indicators resulting from the surveys and analysed in this report provide a much more detailed picture of the youth in the labour market in a part of the world where labour market information is sparse and sporadic. Results show that unemployment of young people remains a matter of concern, especially among those with higher education, but that issues relating to the quality of work available to young people are of even greater relevance to the design and implementation of policy interventions.

 

Press Release 27 August 2014

School to work transition

Young workers in Asia face instability and vulnerability

A new International Labour Organization (ILO) report on the transitions of young people from education to the employment market in Asia and the Pacific, finds majority of youth in the region are either in low quality jobs or unemployed.

http://www.ilo.org/asia/info/public/pr/WCMS_302603/lang--en/index.htm

 

[excerpt]

Key findings

·         Five out of 10 young workers in the region are self-employed.

 

·         The average youth unemployment rate (relaxed definition) was 14.2 per cent. The lowest level was in Cambodia (3.8 per cent) and the highest in Nepal (28.9 per cent).

 

·         The qualifications-work mismatch is high among young workers in all five countries, over one-half of young workers in Bangladesh, Cambodia and Nepal are undereducated for the work they do.

 

·         At least one in four working youth expressed a desire to change their job (Samoa was the exception to this).

 

·         Agriculture and services are the main employment sectors for young people. In Bangladesh and Viet Nam industry is the primary sector for young women.

 

·         Too many young people are not benefiting fully from the educational system. In Bangladesh, Cambodia and Nepal, more than 50 per cent of young people finished their education at primary level or below. In Viet Nam it is 31.9 per cent.

 

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