Thursday, September 25, 2014

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[IWS] ADB: ASIAN DEVELOPMENT REVIEW: VOL.31, NO. 2 [24 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html


Asian Development Bank (ADB)

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT REVIEW: VOL.31, NO. 2 [24 September 2014]
http://www.adb.org/publications/asian-development-review-volume-31-number-2
or
http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/pub/2014/asian-development-review-vol31-no2-2014.pdf
[full-text, 208 pages]

Description

The Asian Development Review (ADR) is a professional journal for disseminating the results of economic development research relevant to Asia and the Pacific.

In this issue, topics include the trade implications of the Trans-Pacific Partnership on Asian countries, policy divergence in the context of the Trilemma and its effect on the probability of crises, wage differentials and worker quality in Malaysian manufacturing, productivity spillovers from foreign direct investment in the People's Republic of China (PRC), the determinants and effects on firms of outward direct investment from the PRC, global production sharing and wage premiums in Thai manufacturing, and the fiscal policy implications of the trade-off between development and security spending in Afghanistan.

ADR is published twice a year, in March and September, by MIT Press under the editorship of Professor Masahiro Kawai.

Contents

·       Trade Implications of the Trans-Pacific Partnership for ASEAN and Other Asian Countries - Alan V. Deardorff

·       The More Divergent, the Better? Lessons on Trilemma Policies and Crises for Asia - Joshua Aizenman and Hiro Ito

·       Wage Differentials between Foreign Multinationals and Local Plants and Worker Quality in Malaysian Manufacturing - Eric D. Ramstetter

·       Productivity Spillovers from FDI in the People’s Republic of China: A Nuanced View - Cheryl Xiaoning Long, Galina Hale, and Hirotaka Miura

·       The Dragon Is Flying West: Micro-level Evidence of Chinese Outward Direct Investment - Wenjie Chen and Heiwai Tang

·       Global Production Sharing and Wage Premiums: Evidence from the Thai Manufacturing Sector - Archanun Kohpaiboon and Juthathip Jongwanich

·       Afghanistan: Balancing Social and Security Spending in the Context of a Shrinking Resource Envelope - Aqib Aslam, Enrico Berkes, Martin Fukac, Jeta Menkulasi, and Axel Schimmelpfennig

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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