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[IWS} ADB: ASIAN DEVELOPMENT OUTLOOK 2014 UPDATE: ASIA IN GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS [25 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

 

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT OUTLOOK 2014 UPDATE: ASIA IN GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS [25 September 2014]

http://www.adb.org/publications/asian-development-outlook-2014-update-asia-global-value-chains

 

or

http://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/pub/2014/ado2014update.pdf

[full-text, 190 pages]

 

Description

Developing Asia is continuing along a stable growth path. Although US policy could still surprise markets the effect on developing Asia would be modest compared to the shock caused in 2013 by anticipated tightening. Demand does not threaten to reignite inflation, as regional economies continue to produce somewhat below capacity.

This and benign international commodity prices will keep inflation in developing Asia moderate Many economies in Asia have grown by connecting with global value chains. Strengthening these links could further stimulate expansion of industry and services and create jobs.

Highlights

·       Regional growth is forecast to pick up from 6.1% in 2013 to 6.2% in 2014 and further to 6.4% in 2015.

·       Growth in the major industrial economies slipped in the first half of 2014.

·       Targeted measures to stabilize investment helped the PRC sustain growth.

·       India shows new promise of an economic turnaround.

·       Growth slows in the main economies of Southeast Asia.

·       Weakening food prices and stable oil prices keep inflation in check, remaining steady at 3.4% in 2014 and 3.7% in 2015.

·       Developing Asia’s current account balance remains stable, maintaining a surplus equal to 2.1% of regional GDP in 2014 and 2.0% in 2015.

·       All Asian economies face the challenge of strengthening links to dynamic production chains.

Contents

·       ADO 2014 Update—Highlights

o   Maintaining growth momentum

o   Outlook by subregion

o   Asia in global value chains

·       Maintaining growth momentum

o   Developing Asia sustains its growth path

o   Embracing tighter global liquidity

o   Will demand reignite inflation?

o   Building the ASEAN economic community

o   Annex: Global recovery

·       Asia in global value chains

o   The rise of global value chains

o   Asia’s links to global value chains

o   Forging stronger links with global value chains

·       Economic trends and prospects in developing Asia

o   Central Asia

o   East Asia

o   South Asia

o   Southeast Asia

o   The Pacific

o   Bangladesh

o   People’s Republic of China

o   India

o   Indonesia

o   Malaysia

o   Pakistan

o   Philippines

o   Thailand

o   Viet Nam

·       Statistical notes and tables

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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