Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Tweet

[IWS] EMCC: DRIVERS OF RECENT JOB POLARISATIONA ND UPGRADING IN EUROPE--EUROPEAN JOBS MONITOR 2014 [8 July 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

European Monitoring Centre on Change (EMCC)

 

DRIVERS OF RECENT JOB POLARISATIONA ND UPGRADING IN EUROPE--EUROPEAN JOBS MONITOR 2014 [8 July 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publications/htmlfiles/ef1419.htm

or

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/pubdocs/2014/19/en/1/EF1419EN.pdf

[full-text, 99 pages]

 

Author:

Fernández-Macías, Enrique; Hurley, John

Summary:

This report looks in detail at recent shifts in the employment structure at Member State and EU level, examining the main sectors and occupations that have contributed to job loss and job growth. It finds, for example, that in 2011–2013, the majority of net employment losses continued to occur in middle-paid and low-to-middle-paid jobs in construction and manufacturing. Employment growth remained resilient in high-paid, high-skilled jobs, and knowledge-intensive services have been the main source of this growth. The report also examines some of the likely drivers behind the changing employment structure: technological change, globalisation and labour market institutions. An executive summary is available.

 

 

Contents

Executive summary 1

Introduction 3

Part 1: Recent shifts in the employment structure 11

1 Employment shifts by wage quintile 12

2 Patterns of employment change by worker characteristics 22

3 Conclusions 31

Part 2: Testing theories on what drives job polarisation and upgrading 33

1 Background: Analysing change in the occupational structure 34

2 Methodology 45

3 Descriptive analysis of the different explanatory frameworks 53

4 Testing the different explanatory frameworks 64

5 Conclusions 78

Bibliography 81

Annex 1: Construction of the job rankings 84

Annex 2: Number of jobs by employment shares 87

Annex 3: Employment shares by education quintile 88

Annex 4: ISCO codes 89

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Links to this post:

Create a Link



<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?