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[IWS] Dublin Foundation: OCCUPATIONAL PROFILES IN WORKING CONDITIONS: INDENTIFICATION OF GROUPS WITH MULTIPLE DISADVANTAGES [20 August 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Dublin Foundation)

 

OCCUPATIONAL PROFILES IN WORKING CONDITIONS: INDENTIFICATION OF GROUPS WITH MULTIPLE DISADVANTAGES [20 August 2014]

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publications/htmlfiles/ef1413.htm

or

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/pubdocs/2014/13/en/1/EF1413EN.pdf

[full-text,74 pages]

 

Author:

Peycheva, Darina; Wetzels, Ruud; Parent-Thirion, Agn├Ęs; van Houten, Gijs

Summary:

Job quality indexes are constructed on the basis of such aspects of working conditions as earnings, prospects, working time, and intrinsic job quality. Occupations where job quality is consistently low are labelled ‘occupations with multiple disadvantages’. This report uses data from the fifth European Working Conditions Survey to identify such occupations. It finds that workers in mid-skilled manual and lowskilled occupations do quite poorly when it comes to earnings, prospects and intrinsic job quality, and they report relatively low levels of both physical and mental well-being. However, their working time quality is generally good. In contrast, workers in high-skilled occupations do relatively well on almost all job quality indicators, except working time. An executive summary is also available.

Contents

Executive summary

Introduction

Methodological framework

Key characteristics of work and employment in relation to occupations

Identifying occupations with multiple disadvantages

Conclusions

Bibliography

Annex

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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