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[IWS] BLS: JOB OPENINGS AND LABOR TURNOVER – MARCH 2014 [9 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

JOB OPENINGS AND LABOR TURNOVER – MARCH 2014 [9 May 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/jolts.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/jolts.pdf

[full-text, 18 pages]

and

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

http://www.bls.gov/web/jolts.supp.toc.htm

 

 

There were 4.0 million job openings on the last business day of March, little changed from 4.1 million in

February, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The hires rate (3.4 percent) and separations

rate (3.2 percent) were unchanged in March. Within separations, the quits rate (1.8 percent) was

unchanged and the layoffs and discharges rate (1.1 percent) was little changed in March. This release

includes estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations for the nonfarm sector

by industry and by geographic region.

 

Job Openings

 

There were 4.0 million job openings in March, little changed from 4.1 million in February. The number

of job openings was little changed for total private and for government. The number of job openings was

little changed in all industries. The West region experienced a decrease in job openings in March. (See

table 1.)

 

The number of job openings (not seasonally adjusted) was little changed over the year ending in March

for total nonfarm, total private, and government. Over the year, the job openings level increased in three

industries and decreased in three industries. Over the 12 months ending in March, the number of job

openings increased in the Midwest region but decreased in the Northeast. (See table 7.)

 

Hires

 

There were 4.6 million hires in March, little changed from 4.7 million in February. The number of hires

was little changed for total private and for government. In March, the number of hires was little changed

in all industries and regions. (See table 2.)

 

Over the 12 months ending in March, the number of hires (not seasonally adjusted) increased for total

nonfarm and total private and was little changed for government. The hires level increased over the year

in four industries and decreased in construction. The number of hires rose in the South region. (See table

8.)

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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