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[IWS] World Bank: GENDER AT WORK: A COMPANION TO THE WORLD DEVELOPMENT REPORT ON JOBS [20 February 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

World Bank

 

GENDER AT WORK: A COMPANION TO THE WORLD DEVELOPMENT REPORT ON JOBS [20 February 2014]

http://www.worldbank.org/content/dam/Worldbank/document/Gender/GenderAtWork_web.pdf

[full-text, 91 pages]

 

Highlights

Women around the world are more economically excluded than men.

Social norms affect women’s work by dictating the way they spend their time and undervaluing their potential.

Legal discrimination is a remarkably common barrier to women’s work.

 

Press Release 20 February 2014

Gender at Work: A Companion to the World Development Report on Jobs

http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/gender/publication/gender-at-work-companion-report-to-world-development-report-2013-jobs

 

[excerpt]

Gender at Work: 10 Global Facts

 

• Women’s labor force participation has stagnated, in fact decreasing from 57 percent in 1990 to 55 percent in 2012.

 

• Women on average earn between 10 and 30 percent less than working men.

 

• Women are only half as likely as men to have full-time wage jobs for an employer.

 

• In only five of the 114 countries for which data are available have women reached or surpassed gender parity with men in such occupations as legislators, senior officials, and managers; namely, Colombia, Fiji, Jamaica, Lesotho, and the Philippines.

 

• Women spend at least twice as much time as men on unpaid domestic work such as caring and housework.

 

• A total of 128 countries have at least one sex-based legal differentiation, meaning women and men cannot function in the world of work in the same way; in 54 countries, women face five or more legal differences.

 

• Across developing countries, there is a nine percentage point gap between women and men in having an account at a formal financial institution.

 

• More than one in three women has experienced either physical or sexual violence by a partner or non-partner sexual violence.

 

• In 2010-12, 42 countries reported gender gaps in secondary school enrollment rates exceeding 10 percent.

 

• One in three girls in developing countries is married before reaching her 18th birthday.

 

 

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