Tuesday, January 21, 2014

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[IWS] Towers Watson: THE BUSINESS VALUE OF A HEALTHY WORKFORCE, UNITED STATES [January 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

Towers Watson

 

THE BUSINESS VALUE OF A HEALTHY WORKFORCE, UNITED STATES

2013/2014 STAYING@WORK SURVEY REPORT [January 2014]

http://www.towerswatson.com/DownloadMedia.aspx?media={D8BDD95E-3100-4ADD-A64C-8D2FB7C32B19}

[full-text, 40 pages]

 

see also

WORKFORCE STRESS: THE EMPLOYER/EMPLOYEE DISCONNECT (Infographic)

http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/IC-Types/Survey-Research-Results/2014/01/Workforce-Stress-Infographic

or

http://www.towerswatson.com/DownloadMedia.aspx?media={EA0F756F-C3A5-4211-A4B8-C1B19235855F}

 

 

Staying@Work™ Survey Report 2013/2014, United States

The Business Value of a Healthy Workforce

http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/IC-Types/Survey-Research-Results/2013/12/stayingatwork-survey-report-2013-2014-us

 

[excerpt]

Companies based in the U.S. continue to view health and productivity (H&P) programs as a core component of their organizational health strategy, with 49% saying they are essential to their strategy and 42% saying they play a moderate role. A total of 84% plan to increase H&P program support over the next two years — 17% plan to increase it significantly.

 

Currently, 50% of U.S. employers don’t have a clear, articulated H&P strategy, but nearly six in 10 (59%) plan to design a strategy that is differentiated from competitors in the next three years.

 

As employers increase their H&P investment, they expect better outcomes — both improved employee health and reduced costs. Nearly eight in 10 (77%) say lack of employee engagement is the biggest obstacle to changing behavior. Despite offering a variety of H&P programs, few employees participate.

 

What can you do to boost program success and achieve a workplace health culture? Here are three ideas:

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 




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