Tuesday, December 03, 2013

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[IWS] TRAINING FOR SUCCESS: A POLICY TO EXPAND APPRENTICESHIPS IN THE UNITED STATES [2 December 2013]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

Center for American Progress

 

TRAINING FOR SUCCESS: A POLICY TO EXPAND APPRENTICESHIPS IN THE UNITED STATES [2 December 2013]

By Ben Olinsky and Sarah Ayres

http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/labor/report/2013/12/02/79991/training-for-success-a-policy-to-expand-apprenticeships-in-the-united-states/

or

http://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/apprenticeship_report.pdf

[full-text, 66 pages]

 

[excerpts]

Apprenticeships are not a familiar concept to many Americans, but expanding the

use of this highly effective training model can help our nation meet the demand

for skilled workers, create pathways to well-paying careers for unemployed young

workers, and give American businesses a competitive edge in the global marketplace.

...

In this report, we outline a set of policy recommendations that, if implemented,

will address these challenges and set the stage for a large-scale expansion of

apprenticeships in the United States. We recommend improvements to marketing

efforts to generate demand from businesses, tax incentives to help businesses

defray the cost of training apprentices, and competitive grants to support promising

public-private partnerships. We recommend improving access to workers by

establishing an online database of openings and launching an initiative to bring

recent high school graduates into apprenticeships. And we recommend improvements

to research and data collection that will enhance our understanding of the

economic benefits of apprenticeships and how to expand their reach to women

and workers in nontraditional occupations. We believe that our proposals can connect

workers to good jobs, enable businesses to boost their productivity, and offer

taxpayers a high return on investment.

 

CONTENTS

1 Introduction and summary

4 Our education and training system is not sufficient

9 Apprenticeships can help meet the demand for skilled workers

18 Significant barriers must be overcome to expand apprenticeships

38 Effective policy can address the challenges to establishing apprenticeship programs

53 Conclusion

54 Appendix: Existing funding sources for apprenticeships

56 About the authors

57 Acknowledgements

58 Endnotes

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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