Friday, December 13, 2013

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[IWS] ECLAC: PANAMA: SOCIAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN [online December 2013]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC)

 

SOCIAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN: PANAMA [online December 2013]

http://www.eclac.org/cgi-bin/getProd.asp?xml=%20/publicaciones/xml/4/51834/P51834.xml&xsl=/tpl-i/p9f.xsl%20&base=/tpl-i/top-bottom.xslt

or

http://www.eclac.org/publicaciones/xml/4/51834/SPS_Panama_ing.pdf

[full-text, 56 pages]

 

Abstract:

This report is part of a series of national case studies aimed at disseminating knowledge on the current status of social protection systems in Latin American and Caribbean countries, and at discussing their main challenges in terms of realizing of the economic and social rights of the population and achieving key development goals, such as combating poverty and hunger.

 

Contents

Foreword.......................................................................................................................................... 5

I. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 7

II. Economic and social indicators ............................................................................................... 9

A. Social spending.............................................................................................................. 13

B. Employment and unemployment.................................................................................... 14

III. Basic structure of the social protection and promotion system ............................................. 17

A. Vulnerable groups and the life cycle: dynamic of the legislation ................................... 20

IV. Non-contributory social protection ......................................................................................... 23

A. Opportunities Network.................................................................................................... 25

B. The “100 a los 70” programme....................................................................................... 26

V. Contributory social protection ................................................................................................ 29

A. Coverage........................................................................................................................ 32

B. Programmes run by the Social Security Fund ............................................................... 33

C. Disability, old age and death (IVM) ................................................................................ 33

D. Health, disease, and maternity....................................................................................... 34

E. Professional risks ........................................................................................................... 34

VI. Education system................................................................................................................... 35

VII. Health system ........................................................................................................................ 41

VIII. Housing policies..................................................................................................................... 45

A. Housing programmes.................................................................................................... 46

IX. Employment policies .............................................................................................................. 49

X. Final thoughts ........................................................................................................................ 51

Bibliography................................................................................................................................... 53

 

Tables

TABLE 1 PANAMA: TOTAL AND PER CAPITA GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT, 2000-2010..........9

TABLE 2 PANAMA: ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS, 2009-2011 ...............................10

TABLE 3 PANAMA: GENERAL AND EXTREME POVERTY LINES, BY ANNUAL AND MONTHLY CONSUMPTION, 1997, 2003 AND 2008................................................10

TABLE 4 PANAMA: INCIDENCE OF POVERTY, 2003 AND 2008...................................................10

TABLE 5 PANAMA: POVERTY AND EXTREME POVERTY, 2007-2011.........................................11

TABLE 6 PANAMA: PROPORTION OF THE POPULATION LIVING IN CONDITIONS OF POVERTY AND INDIGENCE BY AREA, 2006-2011...................................................11

TABLE 7 PANAMA: INCIDENCE, DEPTH AND SEVERITY OF POVERTY AND EXTREME POVERTY, BY AREA, 2003 AND 2008..................................................12

TABLE 8 PANAMA: POPULATION LIVING ON AN INCOME OF LESS THAN ONE DOLLAR A DAY, BY AREA, 1997, 2003 AND 2008 .........................................................................12

TABLE 9 PANAMA: SOCIAL PUBLIC SPENDING BY SECTORS, 2007-2011................................13

TABLE 10 PANAMA: LABOUR MARKET INDICATORS, 2000-2010.................................................14

TABLE 11 PANAMA: AVERAGE NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES AND AVERAGE MONTHLY WAGES IN ESTABLISHMENTS WITH FIVE OR MORE EMPLOYEES, BY ECONOMIC ACTIVITY AND REGION 2009-2012...........15

TABLE 12 PANAMA: EMPLOYED POPULATION BY OCCUPATIONAL STRUCTURE 2000-2010...................................................................................................16

TABLE 13 PANAMA: LIFE RISKS AND PROGRAMMES TO ADDRESS THEM, BY AGES AND SOCIAL PROGRAMMES .........................................................................18

TABLE 14 PANAMA: AGREEMENTS OF THE NATIONAL COALITION FOR DEVELOPMENT, 2007 .............................................................................................19

TABLE 15 LAWS, DECREES, DECISIONS AND RESOLUTIONS APPROVED IN THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA, 1900-2000...................................................................21

TABLE 16 PANAMA: PROPORTION OF THE POPULATION BY COMPARATIVE WELFARE LEVEL, AND BY PROVINCES AND INDIGENOUS AREAS, 2011.................24

TABLE 17 PANAMA: MAIN PUBLIC INVESTMENTS TO BE UNDERTAKEN IN THE PERIOD 2010-2014 .........................................................24

TABLE 18 PANAMA: NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS BENEFITED AND CONDITIONAL TRANSFERS PAID IN THE OPPORTUNITIES NETWORK PROGRAMME BY PROVINCES AND INDIGENOUS COMARCAS, 2009-2011...25

TABLE 19 INDICATORS OF THE OLDER ADULT POPULATION, 2007...........................................27

TABLE 20 PANAMA: AVERAGE AND AMOUNT PAID IN THE “100 A LOS 70” PROGRAMME, BY PROVINCES AND INDIGENOUS COMARCAS, 2009-2011.......................................28

TABLE 21 PROBLEMS IDENTIFIED IN THE DEBATES ON THE REFORM OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY FUND.........................................................30

TABLE 22 MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM AMOUNT, INCREASE AND SUBSIDIZING OF DISABILITY AND OLD-AGE PENSIONS, 2005-2009, 2010-2015 AND 2015 AND LATER...............31

TABLE 23 PANAMA: POPULATION COVERED BY THE SOCIAL SECURITY FUND, 2000-2007..............................................................32

TABLE 24 PANAMA: POPULATION OF INSURED AFFILIATES, PENSIONERS, RETIREES AND BENEFICIARIES 1980-2007........................32

TABLE 25 PANAMA: DISABILITY, OLD AGE AND DEATH PROGRAMME, AS A PERCENTAGE OF THE CONTRIBUTION, 2005-2014....................33

TABLE 26 PANAMA: CENTRAL GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE ON EDUCATION, AND COST PER STUDENT, BY LEVEL, 2006-2010 ..................36

TABLE 27 PANAMA: INDICATORS OF OFFICIAL EDUCATION BY LEVEL, 2005 2009..................37

TABLE 28 PROGRAMMES AIMED AT IMPROVING EDUCATION, 2009-2014 ................................38

TABLE 29 PANAMA: PROJECTS TO RESTORE THE HEALTH SECTOR, 2009-2014 ....................43

TABLE 30 CHARACTERISTICS OF HOMES IN PANAMA, 1990, 2000 AND 2010...........................46

TABLE 31 PANAMA: HOUSING PROGRAMMES, PROJECTS AND ACTIONS ...............................47

TABLE 32 MIVIOT PROJECTS TO GUARANTEE DECENT HOUSING TO ALL PANAMANIANS, 2009-2014 ......................48

TABLE 33 PANAMA: TREND OF EMPLOYMENT AND LABOUR-MARKET POLICIES, 1994-1999/2009-2014..................................50

 

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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