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[IWS] Deloiite: THE OPEN TALENT ECONOMY: PEOPLE AND WORK IN A BORDERLESS WORKPLACE [3 July 2013]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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Deloitte

 

THE OPEN TALENT ECONOMY: PEOPLE AND WORK IN A BORDERLESS WORKPLACE [3 July 2013]

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-open-talent-economy/id669663962?ls=1

or

http://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/global/Documents/HumanCapital/dttl-hc-english-opentalenteconomy.pdf

[full-text, 12 pages]

 

Description

 

What the open source model did for software, the open talent economy is doing for work. Driven by global megatrends, the employer-employee relationship has undergone a dramatic shift. Talent is no longer a mere business expense, but an asset to be invested in—and measured. Deloitte Consulting LLP’s new report, The Open Talent Economy, lays out a framework to show how organizations can develop a specific talent strategy that is measurable, tied to business results, and refreshed by a feedback-driven cycle of informed improvement.

 

The Open Talent Economy introduces a framework to guide talent strategy that brings together three components:

 

•External influencers (the global megatrends, along with regional and industry trends)

•Talent investments (the strategies, programs, and infrastructure solutions available to an organization)

•Business performance (the measurable business and talent outcomes of the investments an organization has chosen)

 

 

The framework also recognizes that talent strategy isn’t only about your workforce or the mass of available talent, but also about individuals—each at a different stage of their career and lifecycle as an employee. The ways you acquire, develop, reward, and retain these individuals will vary according to the openness of your strategy.

 

 

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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