Tuesday, August 27, 2013

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[IWS] CECC: CHINA: WORKING CONDITIONS AND WORKER RIGHTS : RECENT DEVELOPMENTS [31 July 2013]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

[Please note that for the next few weeks, postings will include key material that was released since early May 2013 until late August 2013. This is the yearly time period that the IWS Documented News Service is not operational. Otherwise new material will be posted as usual].

 

Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC)

 

WORKING CONDITIONS AND WORKER RIGHTS IN CHINA: RECENT DEVELOPMENTS [31 July 2013]

http://www.cecc.gov/events/hearings/working-conditions-and-worker-rights-in-china-recent-developments

or

http://www.cecc.gov/sites/chinacommission.house.gov/files/documents/hearings/2012/CECC%20Hearing%20-%20Working%20Conditions%20and%20Worker%20Rights%20in%20China%20Recent%20Developments%20-%207.31.12.pdf

[full-text, 143 pages]

 

In recent months, several reports have been released regarding working conditions in Chinese factories that manufacture products popular in the United States—laptops, iPhones, iPads, cordless phones. These reports document excessive overtime, crowded and unsafe working and living conditions, underage workers, and unpaid wages. They note that Chinese workers do not have the right to organize into independent unions, and that the state-controlled union does little to represent them. Meanwhile, China has enacted laws in recent years intended to address worker issues, and the state-controlled union has pledged to better represent workers.

The hearing's witnesses discussed the prevalence of harsh working conditions in Chinese factories in places like Shenzhen and Shanghai, assessed implementation of China's labor laws, and examined the roles the Chinese government, China's state-controlled union, Chinese NGOs, and private companies, including multinationals, play in addressing worker rights and labor reforms. Witnesses also provided recommendations for U.S. policy on worker rights in China.

 

Opening Statements

Representative Christopher H. Smith, Chairman

[ Full text of testimony ]

Senator Sherrod Brown, Cochairman

[ Full text of testimony ]

Witnesses

Panel 1

Mr. Charles Kernaghan, Executive Director, Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights

[ Full text of testimony ]

Mr. Li Qiang, Executive Director and Founder, China Labor Watch

[ Full text of testimony ]

Mr. Harry Wu, Founder and Executive Director, Laogai Research Foundation and Laogai Museum

[ Full text of testimony ]

Panel 2

Ms. Thea Lee, Deputy Chief of Staff, AFL-CIO

[ Full text of testimony ]

Dr. Mary Gallagher, Associate Professor of Political Science and Director, Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan

[ Full text of testimony ]

Mr. Earl Brown, Labor and Employment Law Counsel and China Program Director, Solidarity Center, AFL-CIO

[ Full text of testimony ]

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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