Tuesday, March 10, 2015

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[IWS] OECD: SKILLS FOR SOCIAL PROGRESS: THE POWER OF SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL SKILLS [10 March 2015]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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NOTE: Funding for this service ends on 31 March 2015. Postings will end on this date as well.

 

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

 

SKILLS FOR SOCIAL PROGRESS: THE POWER OF SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL SKILLS [10 March 2015]

http://www.oecd.org/edu/skills-for-social-progress-9789264226159-en.htm

or

http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/skills-for-social-progress_9789264226159-en#page1

[read online, 142 pages]

or

http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/skills-for-social-progress_9789264226159-en

 

 

Today’s children will need a balanced set of cognitive, social and emotional skills in order to succeed in modern life. Their capacity to achieve goals, work effectively with others and manage emotions will be essential to meet the challenges of the 21st century. While everyone acknowledges the importance of socio-emotional skills such as perseverance, sociability and self-esteem, there is often insufficient awareness of “what works” to enhance these skills. Teachers and parents don’t really know whether their efforts at developing these skills are paying off, and what they could do better. Policies and programmes designed to measure and enhance socio-emotional skills vary considerably within and across countries.

 

This report presents a synthesis of the OECD’s analytical work on the role of socio-emotional skills and proposes strategies to raise them. It analyses the effects of skills on a variety of measures of individual well-being and social progress, which covers aspects of our lives that are as diverse as education, labour market outcomes, health, family life, civic engagement and life satisfaction. The report discusses how policy makers, schools and families facilitate the development of socio-emotional skills through intervention programmes, teaching and parenting practices. Not only does it identify promising avenues to foster socio-emotional skills, it also shows that these skills can be measured meaningfully within cultural and linguistic boundaries.

 

see also: Education and Social Progress

http://www.oecd.org/edu/ceri/educationandsocialprogress.htm

and: International Longitudinal Study of Skills Development in Cities

http://www.oecd.org/edu/ceri/internationallongitudinalstudyofskillsdevelopmentincities.htm

 

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