Tuesday, March 17, 2015

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[IWS] Catalyst: TOO FEW WOMEN OF COLOR ON BOARDS AND/OR EMPLOYED BY S&P 500 COMPANIES [17 March 2015]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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NOTE: Funding for this service ends on 31 March 2015. Postings will end on this date as well.

 

Catalyst

 

WOMEN IN S&P 500 COMPANIES BY RACE/ETHNICITY [17 March 2015]

http://catalyst.org/knowledge/women-sp-500-companies-raceethnicity

 

2014 S&P 500 BOARD SEATS HELD BY WOMEN BY RACE/ETHNICITY [17 March 2015]

http://catalyst.org/knowledge/2014-sp-500-board-seats-held-women-raceethnicity

 

STILL TOO FEW: WOMEN OF COLOR ON BOARDS [17 March 2015]

http://catalyst.org/knowledge/still-too-few-women-color-boards

or

http://catalyst.org/system/files/woc_onboards_print.pdf

 

 

Press Release 17 March 2015

Women of Color Remain Severely Underrepresented in US Workforce and on Boards

Catalyst releases new data; convenes Women of Color Summit to forge solutions.

http://catalyst.org/media/women-color-remain-severely-underrepresented-us-workforce-and-boards

 

NEW YORK (March 17, 2015)—Catalyst research has long shown that women working in the corporate world often do not have the same advancement and leadership opportunities as men—a situation that is particularly acute for women of color.

Latest data show that women of color make up only 16.5% of the S&P 500 labor force. And as job level increases, the number of women of color decreases drastically—especially at executive and C-suite levels.

On S&P 500 boards, women of color are nearly invisible. 

 

[Graphic]

 

In addition, new Catalyst research points to a challenging catch-22 for women of color on corporate boards. When nominating women of color, boards look to candidates who already have a record of board service. This poses a significant consequence: reliance on limited networks to fill board seats shrinks the pool of board-eligible women of color to a puddle. 

“We’ll never achieve a truly inclusive workplace as long as women of color continue to face obstacles to leadership,” says Deborah Gillis, President and CEO, Catalyst. “These data suggest that women of color are least likely to benefit from corporate diversity programs. As a call to action we’re hosting the upcomingCatalyst Women of Color Summit, which will gather global experts to provide fresh thinking and spark change for women of color.”

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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