Thursday, March 26, 2015

Tweet

[IWS] BLS: OCCUPATIONAL EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES -- MAY 2014 [25 March 2015]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

NOTE: Funding for this service ends on 31 March 2015. Postings will end on this date as well.

 

OCCUPATIONAL EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES -- MAY 2014 [25 March 2015]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/ocwage.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/ocwage.pdf

[full-text, 23 pages]

 

 

The occupations with the largest employment in May 2014 were retail salespersons and

cashiers, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. These two occupations

combined made up nearly 6 percent of total U.S. employment, with employment levels of

4.6 million and 3.4 million, respectively. Of the 10 largest occupations, only registered

nurses, with an annual mean wage of $69,790, had an average wage above the U.S. all-

occupations mean of $47,230. The highest paying occupations overall included several

physician and dentist occupations, chief executives, nurse anesthetists, and petroleum

engineers. National employment and wage information for all occupations is shown in

table 1.

 

The data in this news release are from the Occupational Employment Statistics program,

which produces employment and wage estimates for over 800 occupations for the nation,

states, and metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas; and by industry or ownership at the

national level. This release contains data on science, technology, engineering, and

mathematics (STEM) occupations. A list of occupations included in the STEM definition

used for this release is available at www.bls.gov/oes/stem_list.xlsx.

 

Occupations

 

   --The 10 largest occupations accounted for 21 percent of total employment in May 2014.

     In addition to retail salespersons and cashiers, the largest occupations included

     combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food; general office

     clerks; registered nurses; customer service representatives; and waiters and

     waitresses.

 

   --Most of the largest occupations were relatively low paying. Excluding registered

     nurses, annual mean wages for the rest of the 10 largest occupations ranged

     from $19,110 for combined food preparation and serving workers to $34,500 for

     secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical, and executive.

     Combined food preparation and serving workers also was one of the lowest paying

     occupations overall, along with fast food cooks ($19,030), shampooers ($19,480),

     and dishwashers ($19,540).

 

AND MUCH MORE...including TABLES....

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Links to this post:

Create a Link



<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?