Monday, February 23, 2015

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[IWS] Eurostat: TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS: 2015 EDITION [23 February 2015]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

European Commission

Eurostat

 

TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS: 2015 EDITION [23 February 2015]

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-statistical-working-papers/-/KS-TC-14-008-1

or

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3888793/6648090/KS-TC-14-008-EN-1.pdf/b0315d39-e7bd-4da5-8285-854f37bb8801

[full-text, 142 pages]

 

This publication presents the second report at the EU level on statistics on trafficking in human beings, covering the period 2010-2012. The data have been collected from different authorities working in the field of trafficking in human beings and are disaggregated by gender, age, citizenship and form of exploitation. The report also provides important information on different national methodologies, which should be taken into account when interpreting the results. The publication was revised in February 2015 with data from Italy concerning the number of people who were prosecuted or convicted for trafficking in human beings.

 

Table of contents

Country codes ....................................................................................................................... 8

Abbreviations and acronyms ................................................................................................. 9

Executive summary............................................................................................................ 10

1. Key findings ................................................................................................................... 13

2. Measuring trafficking in human beings at EU level ....................................................... 14

2.1. The first steps to a European objective ....................................................................... 14

2.2. The complexity of measuring trafficking in human beings ......................................... 15

3. Collecting the statistical data ...................................................................................... 16

3.1. Process of collection of statistical data ....................................................................... 16

3.2. Selection and collection of indicators ......................................................................... 17

3.3. Results ......................................................................................................................... 18

4. Statistical data ........................................................................................................... 20

4.1. Information on victims ................................................................................................ 20

4.1.1. Total number of registered victims by organization ................................................. 20

4.1.2 Number of victims by form of exploitation ................................................................ 29

4.1.3 Number of victims by citizenship ............................................................................... 34

4.1.4 Number of victims receiving assistance and protection ............................................ 42

4.1.5 Comparison between residence permit data from migration statistics and this

data collection ..................................................................................................................... 44

4.1.6 Number of victims by type of assistance received ..................................................... 46

4.2. Police data on suspected traffickers ........................................................................... 47

4.2.1. Number of suspected traffickers by citizenship ........................................................ 47

4.2.2. Number of suspected traffickers by form of exploitation......................................... 53

4.3. Data on prosecutions for trafficking ........................................................................... 54

4.3.1 Number of individuals prosecuted for trafficking, by citizenship .............................. 54

4.3.2 Number of prosecuted traffickers by form of exploitation ........................................ 57

4.3.3. Number of final decisions by the public prosecution service ................................... 57

4.3.4. Number of court judgments (including convictions) of traffickers ........................... 58

Annex - Technical terms, definitions and guidelines ............................................................ 60

Technical terms ................................................................................................................... 60

Definitions and guidelines used for the data collection ..................................................... 60

Guidelines for completing the tables .................................................................................. 65

Information on victims by age and gender ......................................................................... 65

Police data on suspected traffickers by age and gender .................................................... 68

Data on prosecuted traffickers by age and gender ............................................................. 69

Court data on judgments of traffickers by age and gender ................................................ 69

Annex - Tables ................................................................................................................... 71

Annex - Other country notes ............................................................................................ 130

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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