Thursday, January 08, 2015

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[IWS] World Bank: THE RISE OF CHINA AND LABOR MARKET ADJUSTMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA [January 2015]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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World Bank

Policy Research Working Paper 7155

 

THE RISE OF CHINA AND LABOR MARKET ADJUSTMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA [January 2015]

by Artuc, Erhan; Lederman, Daniel; Rojas, Diego

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/21152

or

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/21152/WPS7155.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 58 pages]

 

This paper assesses the impact of the rise of China on the trade of Latin American and Caribbean economies. The study proposes an index to measure the impact on trade, which suggests sizable effects, especially in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Honduras, Mexico, and Paraguay. The paper uses the index and a model of labor mobility, to calculate the impact of China's growth on labor markets in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. The resulting evidence suggests that the rise of China has had positive effects on agriculture and mining in Argentina and Brazil, which offset negative impacts on manufacturing industries, thus leaving total employment and real wages virtually unchanged in the long run. In contrast, the estimated impacts of China's rise on Mexico imply that the sizable shock to manufacturing was not offset by the positive shocks on mining and agriculture, reducing employment in the long run. The paper also discusses the effect of China on the degree of informality in these three economies and contrasts short-run and long-run effects on employment and wages across industries.

 

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