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[IWS] NSF: EMPLOYMENT DECISIONS OF U.S. AND FOREIGN DOCTORAL GRADUATES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY [4 December 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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National Science Foundation (NSF)

InfoBrief NSF 15-302

 

EMPLOYMENT DECISIONS OF U.S. AND FOREIGN DOCTORAL GRADUATES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY [4 December 2014]

by Wan-Ying Chang and Lynn M. Milan

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/2015/nsf15302/

or

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/2015/nsf15302/nsf15302.pdf

[full-text, 10 pages]

 

[excerpt]

Among U.S. doctoral graduates from academic years 2001–09 in the fields of science, engineering, and health (SEH), 89% reported at the time of their graduation the intent to live in the United States, a measure referred to as the expected stay rate.[2] The actual stay rate (the proportion living in the United States) in 2010 tracks the expected stay rate closely for U.S. citizen graduates, but noticeable differences are observed for doctoral graduates who were temporary visa holders at the time of graduation. For this group, the actual and expected stay rates diverge as time since graduation increases (figure 1), indicating that a fraction of those who initially reported an intention to stay eventually left the United States.

 

With the rising international mobility of the highly skilled SEH workforce, policymakers and researchers are interested in understanding the factors influencing their employment destination decisions (Auriol, Misu, and Freeman 2013). This InfoBrief combines data from the 2010 Survey of Doctorate Recipients (SDR), the 2010 Doctorate Records File (DRF), and the 2010 National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG) to define five distinct doctoral populations (table 1). With the recently expanded coverage of the SDR, four U.S.-earned doctorate groups can be identified by their U.S. citizenship status at the time of graduation (U.S. citizen or temporary visa holder) and their residency location in 2010 (United States or abroad). An additional group, foreign-earned doctorates living in the United States, is available from the NSCG, which provides coverage for the U.S.-residing, college-educated population only. These analysis groups will be compared in terms of employment outcomes and working conditions, and the associations between their employment characteristics and ratings of job factors will be examined to shed light on issues potentially influencing their employment decisions.

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