Thursday, November 13, 2014

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[IWS] JILPT: [JAPAN] EVIDENCE-BASED DEBATE ON DISMISSAL REGULATION [Updated 12 November 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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Japan Institute for Labour Policy and Training (JILPT)

 

JILPT RESEARCH EYE--A series of labor-related information (evidence) that contributes to the formation of labor policies.

http://www.jil.go.jp/english/researcheye/index.htm

 

 

EVIDENCE-BASED DEBATE ON DISMISSAL REGULATION [Published on June 9th, 2014 (Nov.12, 2014 Updated)]

by Keiichiro HAMAGUCHI, Department of Industrial Relations

http://www.jil.go.jp/english/researcheye/bn/RE001.htm

 

[excerpt]

In Japan today, as regards termination of employment in the form of dismissal, suggestion of termination and non-renewal of contracts, there were only an extremely small number of cases (recently about 1,600 cases per year) brought to courts of law, and the content of these cases remains unknown unless a judgment is made. Every year, 100,000 cases of consultation on termination of employment are taken to Labour Bureaus all over the country. By analyzing conciliation documents that record the details of these cases, it may be possible to approximate their realities to a certain extent. Beside, Labour tribunals held in courts exist as an intermediate system between these two (litigation and conciliation), and the results of a survey on these, conducted by the Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, were published in 2011. In the following paragraphs, I will take a general review of the analysis of conciliation including a comparison with their survey results.

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