Tuesday, November 18, 2014

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[IWS] ILO/MPI: AIMING HIGHER: POLICIES TO GET IMMIGRANTS INTO MIDDLE-SKILLED WORK IN EUROPE [18 November 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

 

International Labour Organization (ILO) & Migration Policy Institute (MPI)

 

AIMING HIGHER: POLICIES TO GET IMMIGRANTS INTO MIDDLE-SKILLED WORK IN EUROPE [18 November 2014]

http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/media-centre/press-releases/WCMS_320425/lang--en/index.htm

or

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---protrav/---migrant/documents/publication/wcms_320425.pdf

[full-text, 39 pages]

 

Press Release 18 November 2014

Many immigrants in Europe struggling to move out of low-skilled jobs; European governments have opportunities to prioritize policies to secure upward mobility

http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/media-centre/press-releases/WCMS_319812/lang--en/index.htm?shared_from=media-mail

 

WASHINGTON and GENEVA — Against a backdrop of aging populations and persistently low economic growth, few European governments are doing enough to help recent immigrants move from low-skilled precarious jobs and into decent work, says a new report by the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) and International Labour Organization (ILO).

 

The report, Aiming Higher: Policies to Get Immigrants into Middle-Skilled Work in Europe, shows that while some countries have made sizeable investments in labour market integration policies over the past decade, they have focused primarily on getting immigrants into work. As a result, these policies have struggled to facilitate career progression over time.

 

AND MORE....

 

The report offers a series of recommendations for policymakers to consider, including:

·         Improving the incentives for public employment agencies to serve the needs of migrants and developing a better-trained and/or more specialized workforce of advisors to provide both short- and longer-term career advice — rather than focusing exclusively on getting people to work as quickly as possible in any job.

·         Funding partnerships between employers and training institutions to assist employers willing to facilitate language instruction or support apprenticeships and work experience programmes.

·         Improving the coordination of policies enacted at federal, state and local levels, and promoting common goals, information sharing and mutual accountability for integration outcomes.

·         More effective evaluation of innovative labour market integration programmes and monitoring of their impacts over the long-term.

 

Read the country case studies and other reports in the 14-report research series.

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