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[IWS] GLOBAL CONNECTEDNESS INDEX 2014: ANALYZING GLOBAL FLOWS AND THEIR POWER TO INCREASE PROSPERITY [3 November 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Deutsche Post DHL Group

 

GLOBAL CONNECTEDNESS INDEX 2014: ANALYZING GLOBAL FLOWS AND THEIR POWER TO INCREASE PROSPERITY [3 November 2014]

by Pankaj Ghemawat and Steven A. Altman

http://www.dhl.com/en/about_us/logistics_insights/studies_research/global_connectedness_index/global_connectedness_index.html#.VGNr1fnF98F

or

http://www.dhl.com/content/dam/Campaigns/gci2014/downloads/dhl_gci_2014_study_low.pdf

[full-text, 292 pages]

 

DHL released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI), a detailed analysis of the state of globalization around the world. The latest report shows that global connectedness, measured by cross-border flows of trade, capital, information and people, has recovered most of its losses incurred during the financial crisis. Especially the depth of international interactions – the proportion of interactions that cross national borders – gained momentum in 2013 after its recovery had stalled in the previous year. Nonetheless, trade depth, as a distinct dimension of globalization, continues to stagnate and the overall level of global connectedness remains quite limited, implying that there could be gains of trillions of US dollars if boosted in future years.

 

 

Press Release 3 November 2014

Globalization is recovering from financial crisis, DHL Global Connectedness Index reveals

http://www.dhl.com/en/press/releases/releases_2014/group/globalization_recovering_from_financial_crisis.html

 

·         The world’s economic center of gravity shifts eastward; emerging economies see bigger connectedness gains than advanced economies

·         Flows of trade, capital, information and people stretched out over more distant geographies, documenting a decline in regionalization

·         Europe remains most globally connected region; Netherlands again ranks No. 1

 

DHL, the global logistics leader, today released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI), a detailed analysis of the state of globalization around the world. The latest report shows that global connectedness, measured by cross-border flows of trade, capital, information and people, has recovered most of its losses incurred during the financial crisis. Especially the depth of international interactions – the proportion of interactions that cross national borders – gained momentum in 2013 after its recovery had stalled in the previous year. Nonetheless, trade depth, as a distinct dimension of globalization, continues to stagnate and the overall level of global connectedness remains quite limited, implying that there could be gains of trillions of US dollars if boosted in future years.

 

AND MUCH MORE….

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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