Wednesday, September 10, 2014

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[IWS] World Bank: IMPROVING BASIC SERVICES FOR THE BOTTOM FORTY PERCENT: LESSONS FROM ETHIOPIA [2 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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World Bank

 

IMPROVING BASIC SERVICES FOR THE BOTTOM FORTY PERCENT: LESSONS FROM ETHIOPIA [September 2014]

by Khan, Qaiser M.; Faguet, Jean-Paul; Gaukler, Christopher; Mekasha, Wendmsyamregne

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/20001

or

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/20001/904300PUB0see004648033140EPI0210331.pdf?sequence=1

[full-text, 139 pages]

 

Ethiopia, like most developing countries, has opted to deliver services such as basic

education, primary health care, agricultural extension advice, water, and rural roads through a highly

decentralized system (Manor 1999; Treisman 2007). That choice is based on several decades of theoretical analysis

examining how a decentralized government might respond better to diverse local needs and provide public goods more

efficiently than a highly centralized government. Ethiopia primarily manages the delivery of basic services at the

woreda (district) level. Those services are financedpredominantly through intergovernmental fiscal transfers

(IGFTs) from the federal to the regional and then the woreda  administrations, although some woredas raise a small amount

of revenue to support local services. Since 2006, development partners and the government have cofinanced

block grants for decentralized services through the Promoting Basic Services (PBS) Program. Aside from funding

the delivery of services, the program supports measures to  improve the quality of services and local governments

 capacity to deliver them by strengthening accountability and  citizen voice.

 

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