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[IWS] NCES: TEACHER ATTRITION AND MOBILITY: RESULTS FROM THE 2012-13 TEACHER FOLLOW-UP SURVEY [4 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)

 

Teacher Attrition and Mobility: Results From the 2012-13 Teacher Follow-up Survey [4 September 2014]

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2014077

or

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2014/2014077.pdf

[full-text, 40 pages]

 

Description:       

This First Look report provides some selected findings from the 2012-13 Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) along with data tables and methodological information. The TFS is a follow-up of a sample of the elementary and secondary school teachers who participated in the previous year’s Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). The TFS sample includes teachers who leave teaching in the year after the SASS data collection and those who continue to teach either in the same school as last year or in a different school. The purpose of the Teacher Follow-up Survey is to determine how many teachers remained at the same school, moved to another school or left the profession in the year following the SASS administration.

 

List of Tables

Table Page

1. Number and percentage distribution of public school teacher stayers, movers, and leavers: 1988–89 through 2012–13......................................... 6

2. Number and percentage distribution of public school teacher stayers, movers, and leavers, by selected teacher and school characteristics in the base year: 2012–13 ................................................................. 7

3. Percentage distribution of public school teacher movers who moved across schools, school districts, and sectors, by years of experience and type of move: 2011–12 through 2012–13 .......................................................... 9

4. Percentage distribution of public school teacher movers who changed schools involuntarily or who rated various reasons as the most important in their decision to move from their base year school: 2011–12 through 2012–13 ........................................................................... 10

5. Percentage distribution of public school teacher leavers who left teaching involuntarily or who rated various reasons as the most important in their decision to leave the position of a K–12 teacher: 2012–13 .................................................................................................................... 11

6. Total number and percentage distribution of public school teacher leavers, by their current occupational and industry status: 2012–13 ........................ 12

7. Percentage distribution of working public teacher leavers who rated various aspects of their current occupation as better in teaching, better in current position, or not better or worse: 2012–13 ...................................... 13

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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