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[IWS] LITTLE EVIDENCE OF THE ACA INCREASING PART-TIME WORK SO FAR [3 September 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation & Urban Institute

 

LITTLE EVIDENCE OF THE ACA INCREASING PART-TIME WORK SO FAR [3 September 2014]

by Bowen Garrett and Robert Kaestner

http://www.rwjf.org/en/research-publications/find-rwjf-research/2014/09/little-evidence-of-the-aca-increasing-part-time-work-so-far.html

or

http://www.rwjf.org/content/dam/farm/reports/reports/2014/rwjf415284

[full-text, 7 pages]

 

 

There has been considerable public policy debate and media attention over the employment effects of the Affordable

Care Act (ACA), and one of the most contentious issues has been whether the ACA has, or will, increase part-time work

at the expense of full-time employment. This brief provides new evidence on the question using the latest available data

from the Current Population Survey (CPS).

 

We find no evidence that the ACA had already started increasing part-time work before 2014. We find a small

increase in part-time work in 2014 beyond what would be expected at this point in the economic recovery based

on prior experience since 2000. This increase in part-time work is fully attributable to an increase in involuntary

part-time work. The increase in involuntary part-time work, however, is not specific to the category of part-time work

defined by the ACA (i.e., less than 30 hours per week), but applies to part-time work more broadly (also between 30 and

34 hours per week). Moreover, transitions between full-time and part-time work in 2014 are in line with historic patterns.

These findings suggest that the increase in part-time work in 2014 is not ACA related, but more likely due to a slower than

normal recovery of full-time jobs following the Great Recession.

 

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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