Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Tweet

[IWS] ILO: MATERNITY AND PATERNITY AT WORK: LAW AND PRACTICE ACROSS THE GLOBE [13 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

International Labour Organization (ILO)

 

MATERNITY AND PATERNITY AT WORK: LAW AND PRACTICE ACROSS THE GLOBE [13 May 2014]

http://www.ilo.org/global/publications/ilo-bookstore/order-online/books/WCMS_242615/lang--en/index.htm

or

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---dcomm/documents/publication/wcms_242615.pdf

[full-text, 204 pages]

 

Press Release 13 May 2014

Maternity protection makes headway amid vast global gaps

http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/newsroom/news/WCMS_242325/lang--en/index.htm

 

Despite progress in maternity benefits and a trend supporting paternity leave, an ILO report finds most women around the world are still not protected at work

 

GENEVA (ILO News) – Most countries have adopted maternity protection provisions since 1919, when the ILO adopted the first Maternity Protection Convention, yet at least 830 million women workers still don't have adequate protection, the International Labour Organization (ILO) said in a new report.

 

In its report, Maternity and Paternity at Work: Law and practice across the world, the ILO said 66 countries out of 185 countries and territories have committed to at least one of three maternity protection Conventions adopted in 1919, 1952 and in 2000.

 

These Conventions stipulate the prevention of exposure to health and safety hazards during pregnancy and nursing, entitlement to paid maternity leave, maternal and child health and breastfeeding breaks, and protection against discrimination and dismissal in relation to maternity, as well as a guaranteed right to return to work after maternity leave.

 

AND MORE....

 

KEY FACTS AND FIGURES

 

◾             66 out of 185 countries and territories have ratified at least one of the three ILO maternity protection Conventions.

 

◾             53 per cent (98 countries) meet the ILO standard of at least 14 weeks maternity leave.

 

◾             58 per cent (107 countries) now finance maternity leave cash benefits through social security. Between 1994 and 2013 financing of cash benefits through employer liability fell from 33 to 25 per cent.

 

◾             A large majority of women workers, around 830 million, are not adequately covered in practice, mainly in developing countries.

 

◾             45 per cent (74 countries) provide cash benefits of at least two-thirds of earnings for at least 14 weeks – an overall increase of 3 per cent since the last ILO review in 2010.

 

◾             A statutory right to paternity leave is found in 78 of the 167 countries. Leave is paid in 70 of these, underlining the trend of greater involvement of fathers around childbirth. In 1994, paternity leave existed in 40 of 141 countries with available data.

 

◾             75 per cent (121 countries out of 160) provide for daily nursing breaks after maternity leave.

 The report compares national laws in 185 countries and territories with the most recent ILO standards. International Labour Organization (ILO)

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Links to this post:

Create a Link



<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?