Thursday, May 08, 2014

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[IWS] AFRICA PROGRESS REPORT 2014 [8 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

Africa Progress Panel

 

AFRICA PROGRESS REPORT 2014

GRAIN FISH MONEY: FINANCING AFTRICA'S GREEN AND BLUE REVOLUTIONS [8 May 2014]

http://africaprogresspanel.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/APP_AR2014_LR.pdf

[full-text, 180 pages]

and

Summary

http://www.apo-mail.org/APP_Summary_EN.pdf

[full-text, 24 pages]

 

Press Release 8 May 2014

Plunder of timber and fisheries is holding Africa back – Kofi Annan

http://africaprogresspanel.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Press-release-ENGLISH.pdf

 

 

[excerpt from report]

Africa is a rich continent. Some of those riches – especially oil, gas and minerals – have driven rapid economic growth over the past decade. The ultimate measure of progress, however, is the wellbeing of people – and Africa's recent growth has not done nearly as much as it should to reduce poverty and hunger, or improve health and education.

 

To sustain growth that improves the lives of all Africans, the continent needs an economic transformation that taps into Africa's other riches: its fertile land, its extensive fisheries and forests, and the energy and ingenuity of its people. The Africa Progress Report 2014 describes what such a transformation would look like, and how Africa can get there.

 

Agriculture must be at the heart that transformation. Most Africans, including the vast majority of Africa's poor, continue to live and work in rural areas, principally as smallholder farmers. In the absence of a flourishing agricultural sector, the majority of Africans will be cut adrift from the rising tide of prosperity.

 

To achieve such a transformation, Africa will need to overcome three major obstacles: a lack of access to formal financial services, the weakness of the continent's infrastructure and the lack of funds for public investment.The Africa Progress Report 2014 describes how African governments and their international partners can cooperate to remove those obstacles – and enable all Africans to benefit from their continent's extraordinary wealth

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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