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[IWS] ACCENTURE 2014 COLLEGE GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT SURVEY [6 May 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies-----------------Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor--------------------Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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This service is supported, in part, by donations. Please consider making a donation by following the instructions at http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/iws/news-bureau/support.html

 

ACCENTURE

 

ACCENTURE 2014 COLLEGE GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT SURVEY [6 May 2014]

http://www.accenture.com/us-en/Pages/insight-2014-accenture-college-graduate-employment-survey.aspx

 

see also--

Great Expectations: Insights from the Accenture 2014 College Graduate Employment Survey

http://www.accenture.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/PDF/Accenture-2014-College-Graduates-Survey.pdf

The Accenture 2014 College Graduate Employment Survey explores the expectations and experiences of US college students who will be graduating in 2014 and those who graduated in 2012 and 2013 related to education, skills, finding a job, salary expectations, debt and post-graduation living arrangements.

The survey polled more than 2,000 students and compares the perceptions of the class of 2014 who are preparing to enter the job market, with the experiences of recent grads already in the working world. A similar study was conducted in 2013.

The research reveals that many companies are not providing the talent development and training programs expected by recent college graduates. The vast majority of students graduating from college in 2014 (80 percent) expect their first employers to provide them with a formal training program, however, 52 percent of students who graduated from college in the past two years say they did not receive training in their first job. The research also found that nearly half (46 percent) of those who graduated in 2012 and 2013 consider themselves underemployed and working in jobs that do not require their college degrees, up from 41 percent of recent graduates participating in last year’s survey.

 

View the Infographic: What Awaits 2014 Grads in the Working World?

The research identifies several strategies for how employers can improve how they hire and develop entry-level talent coming out of college, something that is essential to maximizing the overall “talent supply chain”.

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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