Thursday, February 20, 2014

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[IWS] BLS: REAL EARNINGS * JANUARY 2014 [20 February 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

REAL EARNINGS * JANUARY 2014 [20 February 2014]

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/realer.nr0.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/realer.pdf

[full-text, 5 pages]

 

 

All employees

 

Real average hourly earnings for all employees rose 0.1 percent from December to January, seasonally

adjusted, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This increase stems from a 0.2 percent

increase in average hourly earnings being partially offset by a 0.1 percent increase in the Consumer

Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U).

 

Real average weekly earnings rose 0.1 percent over the month due to the 0.1 percent increase in real

average hourly earnings combined with an unchanged average workweek. 

 

Real average hourly earnings rose 0.4 percent, seasonally adjusted, from January 2013 to January 2014.

The increase in real average hourly earnings, combined with an unchanged average workweek, resulted

in a 0.4 percent increase in real average weekly earnings over this period.?

 

 

Production and nonsupervisory employees

 

Real average hourly earnings for production and nonsupervisory employees rose 0.2 percent from

December to January, seasonally adjusted. This increase stems from a 0.3 percent increase in average

hourly earnings being partially offset by a 0.1 percent increase in the Consumer Price Index for Urban

Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W).

 

Real average weekly earnings rose 0.2 percent over the month due to the increase in real average hourly

earnings combined with an unchanged average workweek.

 

Real average hourly earnings rose 0.7 percent, seasonally adjusted, from January 2013 to January 2014.

The increase in real average hourly earnings, combined with a 0.3 percent decrease in the average

workweek, resulted in a 0.3 percent increase in real average weekly earnings over this period.

 

______________

Real Earnings for February 2014 is scheduled to be released on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at

8:30 a.m. (EDT).

 

 

Revisions to Real Earnings Data

 

The seasonally adjusted constant dollar series presented in this release have been revised to reflect new seasonal

adjustment factors calculated for the CPI-U and CPI-W. This revision affects real earnings for both all employees

and production and nonsupervisory employees from January 2009 through December 2013.

 

The estimates of average weekly hours and average hourly and weekly earnings were revised with the release of

January data on February 7, 2014 to reflect new employment benchmarks and the updating of seasonal adjustment

factors for the establishment survey data. Unadjusted data were revised from April 2012 forward. Seasonally

adjusted hours and earnings series were revised from January 2009 forward in accordance with the usual practice

of revising 5 years of data. In addition, historical reconstructions of some series extended back to 1979. For more

information on the annual benchmark revisions and historical reconstruction, see www.bls.gov/ces/cesbmart.pdf

 

AND MORE...including TABLES....

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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