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[IWS] OECD: REVENUE STATISTICS IN LATIN AMERICA 1990-2012 [20 January 2014]

IWS Documented News Service

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Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

 

REVENUE STATISTICS IN LATIN AMERICA 1990-2012 [20 January 2014]

http://www.latameconomy.org/en/revenue-statistics/11/

or

http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/taxation/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-2014_9789264207943-en-fr

or

http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/taxation/revenue-statistics-in-latin-america-2014_9789264207943-en-fr#page1

[read online, 206 pages]

 

Press Release 20 January 2014

Latin America: Tax revenues continue to rise, but are low and varied among countries, according to new OECD-ECLAC-CIAT report

http://www.oecd.org/newsroom/latin-america-tax-revenues-continue-to-rise-but-are-low-and-varied-among-countries-according-to-new-oecd-eclac-ciat-report.htm

 

[excerpts]

20/01/2014 – Tax revenues in Latin American countries continue to rise but are lower as a proportion of their national incomes than in most OECD countries. The publication Revenue Statistics in Latin America 1990-2012 (third edition) shows that the average tax revenue to GDP ratio in the 18 Latin American and Caribbean countries covered by the report[1]  increased steadily from 18.9% in 2009 to 20.7% in 2012 after falling from a high point of 19.5% in 2008.

...

A special chapter in the report describes the trends driving revenues from non-renewable natural resources across Latin America. Increased global demand for commodities, especially in large emerging markets, has led to sharp price increases and greater fiscal revenues associated with non-renewable natural resources. While these revenues increased at a faster rate than other government revenues before the crisis, their performance has been roughly 3 times more volatile than overall tax-to-GDP growth since 2000.

 

In many Latin American countries, fiscal revenues from non-renewable natural resources continue to be very important as a percentage of total revenues, accounting for more than 30% of the total in Bolivia, Ecuador, Mexico and Venezuela. This implies both a greater benefit from the revenues they generate as well as a higher level of risk due to the dynamics of the global market.

 

 

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