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[IWS] NCHS: SUMMARY HEALTH STATISTICS FOR THE U.S. POPULATION: NATIONAL HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY 2012 [Provisional Report] [30 December 2013]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)

Vital and Health Statistics Series 10, Number 258

 

SUMMARY HEALTH STATISTICS FOR THE U.S. POPULATION: NATIONAL HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY 2012 [Provisional Report] [30 December 2013]

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_258.pdf

[full-text, 151 pages]

 

This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Estimates are disaggregated by sex, age, race, Hispanic origin, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, injury and poisoning episodes, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

 

Selected Highlights

 

Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2012. About 40 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions. About 5 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living, and about 10 million persons (4%) required the help of another person with instrumental activities of daily living. Among persons under age 65, about 45 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.

 

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 




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