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[IWS] CRS: EXPIRING UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE PROVISIONS [27 December 2013]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

Congressional Research Service (CRS)

 

Expiring Unemployment Insurance Provisions

Katelin P. Isaacs, Analyst in Income Security

December 27, 2013

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41508.pdf

[full-text, 9 pages]

 

Summary

Several key provisions related to extended federal unemployment benefits are temporary and, therefore, scheduled to expire:

 

• Authorization for the temporary Emergency Unemployment Compensation

(EUC08) program is scheduled to expire the week ending on or before January 1,

2014 (i.e., December 28, 2013; or December 29, 2013, in New York state).

 

• The temporary 100% federal financing of the Extended Benefit (EB) program

ends December 31, 2013.

 

• The temporary option for states to use three-year lookbacks as part of their EB

triggers expires the week ending on or before December 31, 2013.

 

Once these federal unemployment provisions expire, only regular, state-financed unemployment

benefits from the Unemployment Compensation (UC) program will generally be available. In

most states, UC provides up to 26 weeks of benefits.

 

This report describes the consequences of these expirations for the financing and availability of

unemployment benefits in states.

 

This report also summarizes current legislative proposals to extend these expiring provisions:

• Among other provisions, H.R. 2821, the American Jobs Act of 2013, would

extend these temporary unemployment insurance provisions for two additional

years (i.e., through December 2015).

 

• H.R. 3546 and S. 1747, the House and Senate versions of the Emergency

Unemployment Compensation Extension Act of 2013, would extend the expiring

unemployment insurance provisions for an additional year (i.e., through

December 2014).

 

• S. 1797, also titled the Emergency Unemployment Compensation Extension Act

of 2013, would extend the expiring unemployment insurance provisions through

December 2014, while also permitting any state that terminated a EUC08

agreement in 2013 to reenter into an agreement to pay EUC08 benefits.

 

• H.R. 3773, the Unemployed Jobhunters Protection and Assistance Act of 2013,

would extend the authorization for the EUC08 program for an additional year

(i.e., through December 2014). It would not extend the expiring EB provisions.

 

• S. 1845, the Emergency Unemployment Compensation Extension Act, would

extend the expiring unemployment insurance provisions for an additional three

months (i.e., through March 2014). It would also allow any state that had

legislatively lowered its UC benefit level before December 1, 2013, to be treated

as not in violation of the EUC08 “nonreduction” rule.

 

Contents

Expiration of Federal Extended Unemployment Insurance Provisions ........................................... 1

Federal Programs to Extend UI Benefits: EUC08 and EB ........................................................ 1

EUC08 ................................................................................................................................. 1

EB ........................................................................................................................................ 2

Consequences of UI Expirations ............................................................................................... 2

Availability of EUC08 Benefits .......................................................................................... 2

Financing of EB Benefits .................................................................................................... 3

EB Trigger Components ...................................................................................................... 3

Legislation to Extend Temporary UI Provisions ....................................................................... 5

 

Tables

Table 1. States with Temporary EB TUR Trigger Provisions .......................................................... 4

Table 2. States with Temporary EB Three-Year Lookback Provisions ............................................ 4

 

Contacts

Author Contact Information............................................................................................................. 6

 

 

________________________________________________________________________

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 

 




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