Tuesday, December 17, 2013

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[IWS] NCHS: HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE AND ADVERSE EXPERIENCE WITH PHYSICIAN AVAILABILITY: UNITED STATES, 2012 [17 December 2013]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

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National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)

DATA BRIEF, No. 138

 

HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE AND ADVERSE EXPERIENCE WITH PHYSICIAN AVAILABILITY: UNITED STATES, 2012 [17 December 2013]

by Renee M. Gindi, Ph.D.; Whitney K. Kirzinger, M.P.H.; and Robin A. Cohen, Ph.D.

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db138.htm

or

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db138.pdf

[full-text, 8 pages]

 

Key findings

Data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2012

·         In the 12 months prior to interview, 2.4% of people in the U.S. had problems finding a general doctor, 2.1% had been told that a doctor would not accept them as new patients, and 2.9% had been told that a doctor did not accept their health care coverage.

·         People under age 65 who had public coverage only were more likely than those with private insurance to have these three types of adverse experiences with physician availability.

·         Adults aged 18–64 who were uninsured were more likely than privately insured adults to have trouble finding a general doctor or be told that a doctor would not accept them as new patients.

·         Adults aged 65 and over with Medicare only were as likely as those with both Medicare and private insurance to have these experiences with physician availability.

 

Rates of private insurance and public coverage have been increasing (1,2). As coverage and utilization increase, a growing concern is the availability of health care providers to meet patient needs (3). Almost 90% of general physicians accept new patients with private insurance, but less than 75% accept new patients with public coverage (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid), and the proportion of specialists accepting new patients with Medicare or Medicaid is declining (4). While most studies approach access from a provider perspective, this report examines the percentage of people who had each of three adverse experiences with physician availability in the past 12 months. Estimates were produced by age group and health insurance status using data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

 

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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