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[IWS] BLS: INJURIES, ILLNESSES, AND FATAL INJURIES IN MINING IN 2010 [4 February 2013]

IWS Documented News Service

_______________________________

Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach

School of Industrial & Labor Relations-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies

Cornell University

16 East 34th Street, 4th floor---------------------- Stuart Basefsky

New York, NY 10016 -------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

________________________________________________________________________

 

Beyond the Numbers

January 2013, vol. 2, no. 1

Workplace Injuries

 

INJURIES, ILLNESSES, AND FATAL INJURIES IN MINING IN 2010 [4 February 2013]

http://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-2/injuries-illnesses-and-fatal-injuries-in-mining-in-2010.htm

or

http://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-2/pdf/injuries-illnesses-and-fatal-injuries-in-mining-in-2010.pdf

[full-text, 8 pages]

 

[excerpt]

 

Fatal injuries in the mining industry declined throughout the 20th century. From 1900 to 1945 there were more than 1,000 fatal injuries every year in coal mining alone, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).1 Since the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) began collecting fatal injury data in 1992, there have been no more than 60 fatal injuries in coal mining in any given year, and fewer than 200 fatal injuries per year for all workers in the mining industry as a whole. Despite such improvements, fatal injury rates in mining remain more than four times higher than the average for all industries, and high-profile accidents continue to make headlines. The explosion in the Upper Big Branch coal mine in West Virginia in April 2010 took the lives of 29 workers, which was more than the total number of fatal injuries in coal mining in 2009.2 Also in April 2010, an explosion and fire on the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico killed 11 workers. In total, there were 172 fatal work injuries in the mining industry during 2010.

 

In addition to the fatal work injuries, there were 15,500 recordable nonfatal injuries and illnesses in the mining industry during 2010, a rate of 2.3 incidents per 100 full-time workers. The number of nonfatal injuries and illnesses in the mining industry declined 12.4 percent from 2009.

 

 

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This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

 




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